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I have a class with a template function:

Foo.h:

class Foo {
public:
    int some_function();
    bool some_other_function(int a, const Bar& b) const;

    template<typename T>
    int some_template_function(const T& arg);
};

template<typename T>
int Foo::some_template_function(const T& arg){
   /*...generic implementation...*/
}

Now I've come to a point where I want to be able to access Foo via a proxy class, as in the Proxy design pattern.


Intuitively, I'd like to refactor as follows (the following code is incorrect, but it expresses my "idealized" API):

FooInterface.h:

class FooInterface {
public:
    virtual int some_function()=0;
    virtual bool some_other_function(int a, const Bar& b) const=0;

    template<typename T>
    virtual int some_template_function(const T& arg)=0;
};

FooImpl.h:

#include "FooInterface.h"

/** Implementation of the original Foo class **/
class FooImpl : public FooInterface {
public:
    int some_function();
    bool some_other_function(int a, const Bar& b) const;

    template<typename T>
    int some_template_function(const T& arg);
};

template<typename T>
int FooImpl::some_template_function(const T& arg){
   /*...generic implementation...*/
}

FooProxy.h:

#include "FooInterface.h"

class FooProxy : public FooInterface{
protected:
    FooInterface* m_ptrImpl; // initialized somewhere with a FooImpl*; unimportant in the context of this question
public:
    int some_function()
        { return m_ptrImpl->some_function(); }
    bool some_other_function(int a, const Bar& b) const
        { return m_ptrImpl->some_other_function(a,b); }

    template<typename T>
    int some_template_function(const T& arg)
        { return m_ptrImpl->some_template_function(arg); }
};

But this code fails miserably.

First and foremost, FooImpl can't compile, since class template functions can't be virtual.

What's more, even if I played around with the definition of some_template_function, even if I go as far as relocating it into a concrete class or some other jury-rigging, it's still going to wreak havoc with the whole point of having a proxy class in the first place, because template code needs to be defined in the header and included. That would force FooProxy.h to include FooImpl.h, and FooImpl.h needs all the implementation details and file-includes necessary to implement some_template_function. So if I'm using the Proxy pattern in order to obscure implementation details, distance myself from a concrete implementation, and avoid unnecessary file-includes, then I'm out of luck.

Is there a way to apply the Proxy pattern, or some variation thereof, to a class with template functions? Or is is this impossible in C++?


Context: At the moment, I'm trying to provide proxy access to a group of classes which have a preexisting, built-in logging mechanism. The only API I have for this log uses variadic templates, so it's impossible to predict the parameter combinations it'll be used with. I'd like the separation between the implementation and the client using the proxy to be as clean as possible, and I need to minimize dependencies from the client to the implementation, but I do need them to write to the same log.

However, I am interested in this issue beyond my immediate problem. It's puzzling to me that templates poke such a hole into a major design pattern, and that I haven't found this issue addressed anywhere.

share|improve this question
    
Yes, there is a way of doing that if you know at compile time what you want. This smells a bit like the xy problem, so can you elaborate a bit on what you are trying to do instead of how? If you cannot predict all the types for which you might possibly need to instantiate the template then there is no way to hide the template implementation, otherwise you can explicitly instantiate the template for the types you need. –  mars Aug 3 '13 at 20:32
    
@mars: Fair enough; I was trying to reduce the question to minimal form. I'll edit in some context. –  Ziv Aug 3 '13 at 20:38
1  
Sorry, but I don't come up with a solution on how to write a proxy with template methods that doesn't also put the original template code in a header (will precompiled headers help?). Beyond your problem, writing a proxy template <class Implementation> class proxy {Implementation * m_ptrImpl;...}; works the way you expect as long as the template method is either available or explicitly instantiated. How to achieve virtual template function in c++ could be interesting, suggesting the visitor pattern. –  mars Aug 3 '13 at 22:10
1  
As @mars points out, the fact that templates require that the implementation be visible in a header does not prevent you from implementing the proxy pattern. The problem is that you have an additional requirement that the implementation be hidden using the pimpl idiom. This can be done, but requires a different approach: see stackoverflow.com/questions/17038434/… –  willj Aug 5 '13 at 10:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A wrapper/proxy for a class which has a templated interface will always require that the definition of the template class be visible in a header file to the code that calls the wrapper. This is because the code generated for the templated interface depends on the types of the arguments it is called with.

If you're stuck with the existing templated implementation FooImpl, then as @mars writes in the comments, your only option is:

template <class Implementation>
class FooProxy
{
    Implementation * m_ptrImpl;
    //...
};

If you can change the existing implementation, the ideal solution would be to refactor the templated methods and split them into two layers; one layer that depends on the argument types, and a second layer that does not. The code in the existing methods that depends on the argument types should be identical in all implementations, so this layer can be moved into a method of the abstract interface class. The remaining code that does not depends on the argument types can be left in a non-templated method of the implementation class, meaning the implementation details can be hidden in the .cpp file.

Here's an example, based on the scenario of a log that supports writing arbitrary types:

LogInterface.h

class LogInterface {
public:
    template<typename T>
    void write(const T& arg)
    {
        // converts from 'T' to array of characters.
        // calls non-template 'write' as many times as necessary.
    }

    virtual void write(const char* p, std::size_t n)=0;
};

LogImpl.h

#include "LogInterface.h"

/** Implementation of the original Log class **/
class LogImpl : public LogInterface {
public:
    void write(const char* p, std::size_t n);
};

LogProxy.h

#include "LogInterface.h"

class LogProxy : public LogInterface{
protected:
    LogInterface* m_ptrImpl; // initialized somewhere with a LogImpl*
public:
    void write(const char* p, std::size_t n)
        { m_ptrImpl->write(p, n); }
};
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