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Why does dict(k=4, z=2).update(dict(l=1)) return None? It seems as if it should return dict(k=4, z=2, l=1)? I'm using Python 2.7 should that matter.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The .update() method alters the dictionary in place and returns None. The dictionary itself is altered, no altered dictionary needs to be returned.

Assign the dictionary first:

a_dict = dict(k=4, z=2)
a_dict.update(dict(l=1))
print a_dict

This is clearly documented, see the dict.update() method documentation:

Update the dictionary with the key/value pairs from other, overwriting existing keys. Return None.

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What do you mean by "in place"? –  raster-blaster Aug 3 '13 at 22:16
    
@raster-blaster: The method alters the dictionary it operates on. It does not return the altered dictionary. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 3 '13 at 22:16
    
Oh shoot, I see. Seems rather obvious now. Thank you very much. As a sidenote, I think you meant a_dict instead of dict on the second line. –  raster-blaster Aug 3 '13 at 22:18
    
I do indeed, corrected. –  Martijn Pieters Aug 3 '13 at 22:19
    
Tried doing that, it's telling me to wait 7 minutes, will do it asap. –  raster-blaster Aug 3 '13 at 22:22

dict.update() method does update in place. It does not return the modified dict, but None.

The doc says it in first line:

Update the dictionary with the key/value pairs from other, overwriting existing keys. Return None.

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