Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I feel like the answer is right in front of my face but I cannot seem to find it.

My code:

- (void)viewDidLoad {

    numFormatter = [[NSNumberFormatter alloc] init];
    numFormatter.locale = [NSLocale currentLocale];
    [numFormatter setMaximumFractionDigits:2];
    [numFormatter setDecimalSeparator:@"."];
    [numFormatter setAlwaysShowsDecimalSeparator:YES];
    [numFormatter setNumberStyle:NSNumberFormatterCurrencyStyle];
}

-(void)textFieldDidChange:(UITextField *)textField{

    inputLbl.text = [numFormatter stringFromNumber:[NSNumber numberWithDouble:[dummyTextField.text doubleValue]]];

}

If the user inputs 101, it displays as $101.00 when I need $1.01 so the input seems to start after the decimal point, when I want it start at the hundreds point of the decimals.

share|improve this question
    
You mean you want to always treat the last two digits as the fractional part? What if the input is less than three digits? – Josh Caswell Aug 3 '13 at 23:48
    
Yes. If it was less than 3, say they input only "1", then I would want the result to be "0.01" – Jason Renaldo Aug 3 '13 at 23:50
3  
...divide by 100 before formatting? – Josh Caswell Aug 3 '13 at 23:51
1  
@JoshCaswell Ha......(facepalm) as I said, answer right in front of my face. If you want to submit that as an answer, I will accept it. – Jason Renaldo Aug 4 '13 at 0:03
    
We all have these moments... – Josh Caswell Aug 4 '13 at 0:04
up vote 2 down vote accepted

NSNumberFormater takes in a number and formats that number according to whichever style you've set. If the user inputs 101, as you suggest, then one hundred and one is the number being formatted. You've selected the currency style, so you get $101.00. The number is still 101; it is just formatted to look like a currency amount.

If you want $1.01, you're going to have to input the number 1.01. The number formatter doesn't change the number. It just changes the way it's displayed. 1.01 is a number; $1.01 is that number represented as currency. 1.01 is not equal to 101. The number formatter doesn't change the number you input, just how it's displayed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.