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This next behaviour befuddles me, any explanation would be appreciated.

>>> a = (0.1457164443693023, False)
>>> print a
(0.1457164443693023, False)
>>> print a[0]
0.145716444369

Using python 2.7

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2  
That's not really the same question, there it's two different numbers, here it is on and the same. Also in my case both times it is printed and not converted to and from string and float. –  Eran Aug 4 '13 at 6:39
1  
print x is basically equivalent to sys.stdout.write(str(x)). When you do str() on a tuple, the elements of the tuple are returned as their repr. If they used str, it would be confusing to get (1,) for both print ('1',) and print (1,). –  Alok Singhal Aug 4 '13 at 6:47
1  
FYI, this behavior is changed in Python 3 where the str and repr are both at full precision. –  Raymond Hettinger Aug 4 '13 at 7:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The only difference is the print. The number doesn't change, just its representation. You can reduce your problem to:

>>> 0.1457164443693023
0.1457164443693023
>>> print 0.1457164443693023
0.145716444369

(I guess (and this is only and merely a guess) this boils down to __repr__ vs __str__ or something along this line)

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hmm, it is indeed that in this case a[0].__str__() gives the shorter number and a[0].__repr__() give the longer one. I guess printing a float uses str while printing a tupple uses repr. Thanks. –  Eran Aug 4 '13 at 6:44
    
Glad to be of help. –  Hyperboreus Aug 4 '13 at 6:45
2  
@Eran print on a tuple also uses str(), but str() is called on the tuple. A tuple's string representation uses repr() on the elements of the tuple itself. –  Alok Singhal Aug 4 '13 at 6:49

The first calls __ repr __ , the second __ str __

a = (0.1457164443693023, False)
print a
>>> (0.1457164443693023, False)
print a[0]
>>> 0.145716444369

print repr(a[0])
>>> 0.1457164443693023
print str(a[0])
>>> 0.145716444369

For some design reason Double.__ str __() returns fewer decimals.

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Looks like python does not print the full accuracy of a float, but it is still there.

>>> a = (0.1457164443693023, False)

>>> print a
(0.1457164443693023, False)

>>> print repr(a[0])
0.1457164443693023
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