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I have an XML document:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
</installation>

I am adding a child node to this document like this:

data = Nokogiri::XML(IO.read('file')) { |doc| doc.noblanks }
new_record = Nokogiri::XML::Node.new('tag', data)
data.root.add_child(new_record)
File.open('file', 'w') { |dh_file| dh_file.write(data.to_xml(:indent => 4)) }

With this code I get this inside my file:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
<tag/></installation>

Here the noblanks does not work. However, if before inserting the new node my file already has a child node, noblanks works fine:

Before inserting new node:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
    <!---->
</installation>

After inserting new node:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
    <!---->
    <tag/>
</installation>

So, it looks like noblanks works only if it already sees the "pattern". Is there any way I can correctly indent my XML if it does not have any children yet?


Update:

Perhaps noblanks is not the right option to use, but for some reason it works if I already have some nodes under <installation>. Basically what I currently have when adding a child node is this:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
<tag/></installation>

What I need to have is this:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
    <tag/>
</installation>

And the child nodes I add must be empty, with some attributes which I suppressed for simplicity.

share|improve this question

Pretty printing XML is not a guarantee of correct XML, it's just "pretty". Nokogiri generates valid XML, which is much more important.

If you have to have a certain starting format, create a small template for Nokogiri to parse, then build upon it:

require 'nokogiri'

doc = Nokogiri::XML(<<EOT)
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
  <tag/>
</installation>
EOT

puts doc.to_xml

Which generates:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
    <tag/>
</installation>

Adjusting the code a little lets me set the starting root node's ID and the name of the embedded tag:

require 'nokogiri'

ID = 'ayfw-a'
TAG = 'foo'

doc = Nokogiri::XML(<<EOT)
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="#{ ID }">
    <#{ TAG }/>
</installation>
EOT

puts doc.to_xml

Which outputs:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
    <foo/>
</installation>

An alternate way to write this is:

require 'nokogiri'

ID = 'ayfw-a'
TAG = 'foo'

doc = Nokogiri::XML(<<EOT)
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation>
    <tag/>
</installation>
EOT

doc.root['id'] = ID
doc.at('tag').name = TAG

puts doc.to_xml

Which outputs:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
    <foo/>
</installation>

Whatever you do, it lets you work around the issue and be productive.

share|improve this answer

Your two examples are befuddling: they both show the exact same behavior, yet you say one of them does something different.

As far as I can tell, specifying noblanks never gets rid of an empty node:

xml.xml:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<root>
  <installation id="ayfw-a"></installation>
  <dog></dog>
  <cat/>
</root>

.

require 'nokogiri'

data = Nokogiri::XML(IO.read('xml.xml')) { |doc| doc.noblanks }
puts data

--output:--
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<root>
  <installation id="ayfw-a"/>
  <dog/>
  <cat/>
</root>

I would expect the output to be:

<root>
  <installation id="ayfw-a"></installation>
</root>

Of course, the terrible Nokogiri docs (typical of Ruby) do not define what a blank node is. Apparently, the extent of what noblanks does is convert nodes like this:

<dog></dog>

to:

<dog/>

Update

Ahh, so your problem is with the pretty printing of your XML. Okay, I see the same problem you do. Let me show you how you could have asked your question:


I am having trouble formatting my XML the way I want to:

xml.xml:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
</installation>

.

require 'nokogiri'

data = Nokogiri::XML(IO.read('xml.xml')) {|doc| doc.noblanks}
new_record = Nokogiri::XML::Node.new('tag', data)
data.root.add_child(new_record)
puts data.to_xml(indent: 4, indent_text: ".")

--output:--
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
<tag/></installation>

The to_xml() method doesn't seem to work correctly. I expected the output to be:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
....<tag/>
</installation>

But the to_xml() method does format the output the way I want when the tag has a pre-existing child node:

xml.xml:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
  <dog>Rover</dog>
</installation>

.

require 'nokogiri'

data = Nokogiri::XML(IO.read('xml.xml')) {|doc| doc.noblanks}
new_record = Nokogiri::XML::Node.new('tag', data)
data.root.add_child(new_record)
puts data.to_xml(indent: 4, indent_text: ".")

--output:--
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
....<dog>Rover</dog>
....<tag/>
</installation>

How do I get Nokogiri to format the output the way I want it in the first case?


It doesn't look like Nokogiri has a very good pretty printer. It seems that REXML has a better pretty printer than Nokogiri:

xml.xml:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<installation id="ayfw-a">
</installation>

.

require 'nokogiri'

data = Nokogiri::XML(IO.read('xml.xml')) {|doc| doc.noblanks}
new_record = Nokogiri::XML::Node.new('tag', data)
data.root.add_child(new_record)
puts data.to_xml(indent: 4, indent_text: ".")

require "rexml/document"

REXML::Document.new(data.to_xml).write(File.open("output.txt", "w"), indent_spaces = 4)


--output:--
<installation id="ayfw-a">
<tag/></installation>

$ cat output.txt
<?xml version='1.0'?>
<installation id='ayfw-a'>
    <tag/>
</installation>
share|improve this answer
    
I like your efforts.. :)) – Arup Rakshit Aug 4 '13 at 10:26
    
@Babai, Thanks! – 7stud Aug 4 '13 at 10:30

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