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I'm trying out a basic program that will randomly initialize a linked list and print the value at a user-specified index (getnth). However, I'm running into a weird segmentation fault that appears when I comment out a specific cout line, and disappears when I uncomment it.

#include<iostream>
#include<cstdlib>

using namespace std;

struct node
{
    int x;
node *next;
};

void ins(struct node*& headRef, int n)
{
    node *newNode = new node;
if (!newNode)
    return;
newNode->x = n;
if (!headRef)
    newNode->next = NULL;
else
    newNode->next = headRef;
headRef = newNode;
cout<<"\n"<<n<<" inserted at "<<headRef<<"\n\n";
}

void disp(struct node* head)
{
    node *temp = head;
    if (!temp)
{
    cout<<"\n\nLL empty\n";
    return;
}
while (temp)
{
    cout<<temp->x<<" ";
    temp = temp->next;
}
cout<<"\n\n";
}

void getnth(struct node* head, int n)
{
int i=0;
node *temp = head;
while (temp)
{
    if (i == n)
    {
        cout<<"\n"<<temp->x<<"\n\n";
        return;
    }
}

cout<<"\nIndex too high\n";
}

int main()
{
node *head;
int i;

srand(time(NULL));
for (i=0; i<10; i++)
{
    ins(head, rand()%10+1);
    cout<<"Main head is "<<head<<"\n"; // segfault appears if this line is commented out, disappears if it's not
}

cout<<"\nInitial LL\n\n";
disp(head);
cout<<"\nEnter index ";
cin>>i;
getnth(head, i);
return 0;
}
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2  
head is used uninitialized in your program, that's undefined behavior. Please use a debugger and/or valgrind to track down your issue (if that's not it). –  Mat Aug 4 '13 at 8:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In main initialize

node *head=NULL;

and your getnth is wrong , fix it.

May be something like this :-

void getnth(struct node* head, int n)
{
int i=0;
node *temp = head;
while (temp)
{
    if (++i == n)
    {
        cout<<"\n"<<temp->x<<"\n\n";
        return;
    }
    temp=temp->next;
}
cout<<"\nIndex too high\n";
}
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That fixed it, thank you. Is there a reason why uncommenting the line that displays the value of head in main fixes the error even if head is left uninitialized? –  user2650062 Aug 4 '13 at 9:04

By default, the pointer "head" in "main( )" is initialized with garbage, because it's automatic variable allocated on program stack.

So, when you pass the pointer "head" to the function "disp( )", this pointer is dereferenced and it causes segmentation fault.

You have to initialize the pointer "head" with 0 explicitly, and this will fix the problem.

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