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I am trying to implement a simple half precision floating point type, entirely for storage purposes (no arithmetic, converts to double implicitly), but I get weird behavior. I get completely wrong values for Half between -0.5 and 0.5. Also I get a nasty "offset" for values, for example 0.8 is decoded as 0.7998.

I am very new to C++, so I would be great if you can point out my mistake and help me with improving the accuracy a bit. I am also curious how portable is this solution. Thanks!

Here is the output - double value and actual decoded value from the half:

-1 -1
-0.9 -0.899902
-0.8 -0.799805
-0.7 -0.699951
-0.6 -0.599854
-0.5 -0.5
-0.4 -26208
-0.3 -19656
-0.2 -13104
-0.1 -6552
-1.38778e-16 -2560
0.1 6552
0.2 13104
0.3 19656
0.4 26208
0.5 32760
0.6 0.599854
0.7 0.699951
0.8 0.799805
0.9 0.899902

Here is the code so far:

#include <stdint.h>
#include <cmath>
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

#define EXP 4
#define SIG 11

double normalizeS(uint v) {
    return (0.5f * v / 2048 + 0.5f);
}

uint normalizeP(double v) {
    return (uint)(2048 * (v - 0.5f) / 0.5f);
}

class Half {

    struct Data {
        unsigned short sign : 1;
        unsigned short exponent : EXP;
        unsigned short significant : SIG;
    };

public:
    Half() {}
    Half(double d) { loadFromFloat(d); }

    Half & operator = (long double d) {
        loadFromFloat(d);
        return *this;
    }

    operator double() {
        long double sig = normalizeS(_d.significant);
        if (_d.sign) sig = -sig;
        return ldexp(sig, _d.exponent /*+ 1*/);
    }

private:
    void loadFromFloat(long double f) {
        long double v;
        int exp;
        v = frexp(f, &exp);
        v < 0 ? _d.sign = 1 : _d.sign = 0;
        _d.exponent = exp/* - 1*/;
        _d.significant = normalizeP(fabs(v));
    }

    Data _d;
};

int main() {

        Half a[255];

        double d = -1;

        for (int i = 0; i < 20; ++i) {
            a[i] = d;
            cout << d << " " << a[i] << endl;
            d += 0.1;
        }
}
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There's a similar question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3316130/… –  PhoenixX_2 Aug 4 '13 at 14:27
    
Try converting 0.8 to binary and use only the number of bits you have for storage. than try to convert it back to decimal and see the result. If you only have 2 decimal bits you can only use 1/2 and 1/4 thus trying to store e.g. .8 would be represented as 1/2+1/4 = .75 this is closer to .8 than 1 but still you have what you call offset –  ted Aug 4 '13 at 15:56
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I ended up with a very simple (naive really) solution, capable of representing every value in the range I need: 0 - 64 with precision of 0.001.

Since the idea is to use it for storage, this is actually better because it allows conversion from and to double without any resolution loss. It is also faster. It actually loses some resolution (less than 16 bit) in the name of having a nicer minimum step so it can represent any of the input values without approximation - so in this case LESS is MORE. Using the full 2^10 resolution for the floating component would result in an odd step that cannot represent decimal values accurately.

class Half {
public:
    Half() {}
    Half(const double d) { load(d); }
    operator double() const { return _d.i + ((double)_d.f / 1000); }
private:
    struct Data {
        unsigned short i : 6;
        unsigned short f : 10;
    };
    void load(const double d) {
        int i = d;
        _d.i = i;
        _d.f = round((d - i) * 1000);
    }
    Data _d;
};
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Last solution wrong... Sorry...

Try to change the expoent to signed... It worked here.

The problem is that when the expoent turn to be negative, when value < 0.5 you save the expoent as a positive number, it is the problem that cause the number to be big when abs(val)<0.5.

share|improve this answer
    
After the modifications you suggested all Halfs decode to 0... –  user2341104 Aug 4 '13 at 14:42
    
Use the suggestion above. –  rbelli Aug 4 '13 at 15:05
    
I don't think I understand - the exponent cannot be negative... –  user2341104 Aug 4 '13 at 15:15
    
Yes, it can, for example, 0.25 = 1 x 2^(-2). It will be negative for numbers less than 0.5 to -0.5 –  rbelli Aug 4 '13 at 15:32
    
Ah yes, I see, using signed exponent helped fix the error for values between -0.5 to 0.5 but I still have the annoying offset and loss of accuracy. –  user2341104 Aug 4 '13 at 16:30
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