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I have a list of objects, some of which start with 'A', and some of which that don't.

Using either a list comprehension or lambda function (preferably), I'd like to go through each one, and if the element doesn't start with an 'A', to add it on (or return an editted list).

I've tried a few things, such as this (where y is the list):

filter(lambda x: x if x[0] == 'A' else "A" + x, y)

But it's returning the same list, y.

Any help is appreciated; thanks!

Edit: For example, if I started with the list ['Alligator', 'pple', 'banana'], the line would return the list ['Alligator', 'Apple', 'Abanana']

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Please include some sample data, a list of strings. And how you want the result to look like! –  Inbar Rose Aug 4 '13 at 14:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You want to map, not filter:

map(lambda x: x if x[0] == 'A' else "A" + x, y)

or, using a list comprehension:

[x if x[0] == 'A' else "A" + x for x in y]

Filtering is akin to the if statement at the end of the list comprehension, mapping is comparable to the expression at the start.

Demo:

>>> y = ['Alligator', 'pple', 'banana']
>>> map(lambda x: x if x[0] == 'A' else "A" + x, y)
['Alligator', 'Apple', 'Abanana']
>>> [x if x[0] == 'A' else "A" + x for x in y]
['Alligator', 'Apple', 'Abanana']
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Try using this list comprehension:

[x if x.startswith('A') else 'A' + x for x in lst]

For example:

y = ['Alligator', 'pple', 'banana']
[x if x.startswith('A') else 'A' + x for x in y]
=> ['Alligator', 'Apple', 'Abanana']

Notice that using x.startswith('A') is more idiomatic and clearer than asking if x[0] == 'A'.

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Well if you really want to make your filter direction work, you could do this:

>>> example=['Alligator', 'pple', 'banana']
>>> for i,e in filter(lambda t: t[1][0]!='A',enumerate(example)):     
...     example[i]='A'+e
>>> example
['Alligator', 'Apple', 'Abanana']

You filter to return the items you want to change and enumerate gives an index to the item to change as a tuple:

>>> filter(lambda t: t[1][0]!='A',enumerate(example))
[(1, 'pple'), (2, 'banana')]
>>> filter(lambda t: t[1][0]=='A',enumerate(example))
[(0, 'Alligator')]
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list comprehension

>>> y = ['A1', 'B1', 'A2', 'B2']
>>> [i if i[0] == 'A' else 'A%s'%i for i in y]
['A1', 'AB1', 'A2', 'AB2']

Your example:

>>> y = ['Alligator', 'pple', 'banana']
>>> [i if i[0] == 'A' else 'A%s'%i for i in y]
['Alligator', 'Apple', 'Abanana']
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If you need to find items that starts with 'A', you can use list comprehension or filter:

>>> l = ["Aaaa", "test", "A1", "1"]
>>> [item for item in l if item.startswith('A')]
['Aaaa', 'A1']
>>> l = ["Aaaa", "test", "A1", "1"]
>>> filter(lambda item: item.startswith('A'), l)
['Aaaa', 'A1']

If you want to add 'A' to items in the list that dont't start with 'A', you can use list comprehension or map:

>>> l = ["Aaaa", "test", "A1", "1"]
>>> ['A' + item if not item.startswith('A') else item for item in l]
['Aaaa', 'Atest', 'A1', 'A1']
>>> map(lambda item: 'A' + item if not item.startswith('A') else item, l)
['Aaaa', 'Atest', 'A1', 'A1']

FYI, you'll get a new list in both cases. If you want to the modify list in-place, you can try this code:

>>> l = ["Aaaa", "test", "A1", "1"]
>>> for i in range(len(l)):
...     if not l[i].startswith('A'):
...         l[i] = 'A' + l[i]
... 
>>> l
['Aaaa', 'Atest', 'A1', 'A1']
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