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Been having his problem I can't seem to work out, Im trying to post a url to this page for PHP processing (which works), but it can take up to 10 seconds to respond, so I been trying to have a loading gif show while its waiting and it does not seen to go in order. Here is what I got:

$("#r_link_e").html('<img src="<?php echo base_url()?>images/ajax-loader.gif"  />');

        if($("#r_link").val() != ''){

            //Check             
                $.ajax({
                    url: "<?php echo base_url()?>home/check_url/"+$("#r_link").val(),
                    type: 'GET',
                    async: false,
                    cache: false,
                    timeout: 30000,
                    success: function(data) {
                        alert(data);
                    }
            });

What happens on the page:

  • Url submits
  • page freezes
  • alert of response
  • Loading gif shows

Thank you for any help :)

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2  
Remove async: false, or set it as true. –  Jared Farrish Aug 4 '13 at 16:35
    
Async should ALWAYS be true. There's no purpose on using ajax otherwise. –  moonwave99 Aug 4 '13 at 16:35
1  
^^ that's a huge overgeneralization –  user2625787 Aug 4 '13 at 16:37
    
Yes but if I set async to true, it will not wait for a response from the ajax call –  user1977434 Aug 4 '13 at 16:39
    
Why are you waiting? When dealing with these types of techniques, I find it's usually because the coder does not have a good grasp of callback handlers and thus wish to make a call wait so it runs concurrently in a synchronous style. This is not how (primarily) AJAX-style programming is meant to work, you have to learn closures and callback handling to use it correctly. –  Jared Farrish Aug 4 '13 at 16:41

1 Answer 1

If you set async: false, you're telling the browser to synchronize to that function's call responding, meaning it is going to wait. Remove or set to true and it will run asynchronously, e.g., will not freeze the browser waiting for it to finish.

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But it does not wait for the ajax call, it goes onto other function after it, should I use something like a timer to check? –  user1977434 Aug 4 '13 at 16:40
    
This and your last comment below the question seem to say different things. –  Jared Farrish Aug 4 '13 at 16:42
    
See if you can figure out what I'm trying to do with this demonstration: jsfiddle.net/GVJ7b/2 Note, you should have you JS console open. –  Jared Farrish Aug 4 '13 at 17:12

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