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You are given an 2D array of MxN which is row and column wise sorted. What is the efficient way to search for an element?

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closed as off-topic by John Saunders, Kerrek SB, Lorenzo Donati, JB., jilles de wit Oct 13 '13 at 15:12

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1  
Can you post some example of what u exactly wish to do..? – NREZ Aug 4 '13 at 17:35
    
I don't understand "row and column wise sorted". Are all elements in row k <= all elements in row k+1, in addition to each row being sorted? In this case, you could just do a 1-d binary search over the flattened array - assuming the original array is full. – Adrian Ratnapala Aug 4 '13 at 17:39
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Do column/row ranges overlap? – Jason C Aug 4 '13 at 17:40
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@AdrianRatnapala - Each row, viewed alone, is sorted. Each column, viewed alone, is sorted. There are no other constraints on the values (row and/or column ranges can overlap; there may be duplicate elements). – Ted Hopp Aug 4 '13 at 17:50
    
possible duplicate of Search a sorted 2D matrix – RiaD Aug 10 '13 at 13:30

Start in the top right position v of the matrix. If it's the item x you're looking for, you're done. If v is less than the item you're looking for, move down. If v is greater than the item you're looking for, move left. Repeat until you hit the ends of the matrix.

Proof of correctness:

If the top right item is equal to x, there is nothing to prove. Consider two cases

v < x

In this case, we know that all of the elements in the top row are less than x. Thus, we can ignore the entire top row and move down.

Therefore, we can go from

  1 2 3 4 5 6
1 * * * * * v
2 * * * * * *
3 * * * * * * 
4 * * * * * *
5 * * * * * *

to

  1 2 3 4 5 6
1 . . . . . .
2 * * * * * v
3 * * * * * * 
4 * * * * * *
5 * * * * * *

That is, we end up with a smaller problem.

The other case is

v > x

In this case, we know that all of the elements in the right column are greater than x. Thus, we can ignore the entire right column and move left.

  1 2 3 4 5 6
1 * * * * * v
2 * * * * * *
3 * * * * * * 
4 * * * * * *
5 * * * * * *

to

  1 2 3 4 5 6
1 * * * * v .
2 * * * * * .
3 * * * * * .
4 * * * * * .
5 * * * * * .

Again, we end up with a smaller problem. By induction, we are done. This algorithm has time complexity O(m + n).

Edit:

Ted Hopp links to an absolutely beautiful extension of this idea that gives even better performance.

Here's the idea. In the algorithm that I gave above, the idea was that we could eliminate entire rows or columns from consideration at a time. The idea that he links to is to eliminate entire quadrants at time. The idea is simple

* * * * * *
* * * * * *
* * * * * * <- binary search
* * * * * *
* * * * * *

Binary search the middle row. This will give you the item, or a position that brackets the item you're looking for

* * * * * *
* * * * * *
* * * a|b * <- x between a, b
* * * * * *
* * * * * *

Now here is the key insight. The entire upper-left quadrant, and the entire lower-right quadrant can be immediately eliminated from consideration; all the elements in the upper left are less than a, all the elements in the lower-right are greater than b.

. . . . * *
. . . . * *
. . . a|b .
* * * * . .
* * * * . .

Now recurse on the two remaining pieces. Additionally, you can do the same procedure on the middle row or the upper-left to lower-right diagonal depending on which will yield the biggest gains.

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1  
This is a good answer, but the poster doesn't specify if column ranges overlap or not. If so then this wouldn't quite work, consider the case where, e.g. column j has range 10-20 and column j+1 has range 11-21 but the element being searched for is 12. Column j would not be searched. – Jason C Aug 4 '13 at 17:40
    
@JasonC: Yes, you're right. That case made me realize there's a better approach. – jason Aug 4 '13 at 17:48
    
@Jason - Downvoter may have been looking at your post from before the edit. That was not a correct algorithm. – Ted Hopp Aug 4 '13 at 17:52
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@JasonC - Actually, it would perform better than a binary search, as described in the article I link to in my answer. – Ted Hopp Aug 4 '13 at 17:55
    
@TedHopp I know, I just looked at that article and deleted my comment (and answer). Sorry about that. – Jason C Aug 4 '13 at 17:56

There's a very nice write-up here of algorithms to solve this problem. As the article describes, a simple binary search by row for each of the rows (or likewise for each column) gives an O(n log n) solution. However, a simple algorithm that starts at the top right and then proceeds linearly either to the left or down results in an O(n) algorithm. (That's right: linear search beats binary search!) However, even better results come from using binary partitioning of the matrix (based on the linear search) and results in an algorithm that in some cases has O((log n)2) (sub-linear) performance.

The best algorithm seems to be a divide-and-conquer approach: for an m × n matrix M with n (number of columns) < m (number of rows)* and target value v, search the middle row (call it row r) for the index c such that Mr, cv < the target value v is Mr, c+1. If v = Mr, c, then you're done. Otherwise, recursively apply the algorithm to the sub-matrices Mr+1, 0Mm-1, c and M0, c+1Mn-1, r. (These are the bottom-left matrix bounded by cell (r+1, c) and the top-right matrix bounded by cell (r-1, c+1).)

See the link for details about performance and the code itself.

* If n > m, search the middle column instead. If n = m, search the diagonal. The exact boundary for the sub-matrices in each case needs to be slightly adjusted from the above description; see the article.

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That is absurdly beautiful. – jason Aug 4 '13 at 18:06

Typically the first index is "row" and the second is "column", and the column index should be contiguous memory, even if the rows are allocated in separate chunks, so from that perspective, it should be faster to search all columns of one row, then move to the next row and iterate over the columns there.

Obviously, that supposes that all the items you are searching for are equally distributed, and the "first item in each row is more likely to be the candidate you are looking for, and the last of each column least likely".

Also quite obvious, if each row contains values that are sorted, then you can binary search through the columns, as well as skip the entire row if the min and max values aren't covering the range you're searching for.

As with everything "which is faster", you really need to benchmark your solution to determine what is best in your particular situation.

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