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I'm implementing a validator function in a form that has this regex /^[\d\s ().-]+$/ for phone numbers.

I would like to change it to accept a starting + and then all combinations of [0-9] . - , ( ).

Thank you for input.

share|improve this question
    
/\+[0-9.,()-]+/ – Mikulas Dite Aug 4 '13 at 19:49
    
/^\+?[\d\s ()\.,-]+$/ optional '+', escape the dot or it will count for any char – Elpy Aug 4 '13 at 19:50
    
The dot doesn't have any special meaning when in a character class – Pikrass Aug 4 '13 at 19:52
    
Just so you know, the expression you're asking for would match +(-.-), – FakeRainBrigand Aug 4 '13 at 19:53
up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's pretty easy. Don't forget to escape the "+". I assume the "+" is optional, thus use the ? quantifier.

/^\+?[0-9(),.-]+$/
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\+? makes + optional. – John Woo Aug 4 '13 at 19:53
1  
I know and said it in the answer. – Pikrass Aug 4 '13 at 19:56
1  
I would like to change it to accept a starting + .... – John Woo Aug 4 '13 at 19:57
    
Thank you for fast answer! – Rikard Aug 4 '13 at 20:00
1  
@491243: The problem relies in our definition of "accept". It can mean you expect a starting "+", or allow the user to start the string by a "+". Either way, it's no big deal, the OP will choose to add the ? or not. – Pikrass Aug 4 '13 at 20:01

since you want to start with +, you need to tell the engine to start with + by escaping it since it has another meaning,

/^\+[\d\s ().-]+$/

the answer simply answers what you ask but the it does not give you proper result since it will match with +...,..(), I can modify this if you can specifically tell us the acceptable patter you want, eg +639151234567

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Thank you for fast answer! – Rikard Aug 4 '13 at 20:01
    
+1 for the comment about proper results – Pikrass Aug 4 '13 at 20:13
    
accepted upvote ! – softvar Aug 5 '13 at 11:44

Below regex can match any type of number, remember, I have assumed + to be optional. However it does not handle number counting

^\+?(\d[\d-. ]+)?(\([\d-. ]+\))?[\d-. ]+\d$

Here are some valid numbers you can match:

+91293227214
+3 313 205 55100
99565433
011 (103) 132-5221
+1203.458.9102
+134-56287959
(211)123-4567
111-123-4567
share|improve this answer
2  
You're adding rules the original regex didn't have (e.g regarding parenthesis), so you need to explain them in your answer. – Pikrass Aug 4 '13 at 20:05
    
being a simple regex, what to explain, hah ! i didn't do any extraordinary thing, it's just what the user wants :) – softvar Aug 5 '13 at 11:45
    
Indeed, it's a simple regex... Except when you're still learning regexes. :) Explaining the regex will be at least useful for the OP. – Pikrass Aug 5 '13 at 16:23

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