Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a batch file test.bat to start a powershell script:

@pushd "C:\myscripts"
powershell .\test.ps1 arg1 "arg2 with space" arg3
@popd

The script test.ps1 (located at C:\myscripts) is a very simple one like:

# just print out the arguments
Write-Output ("args count: {0}" -f $args.length)
$args

Then I tried to start test.bat. I should get three arguments passed to ps1 but I got the following result:

args count: 5 arg1 arg2 with space arg3

What I expected in the script, args[0] should arg1 and args[1] should be "arg2 with space" and args3[2] be arg3. I cannot understand why the script actually gets 5 arguments.

How can I pass parameters from cmd or batch to powershell as what I expected? Like this:

args count: 3
arg1
arg2 with space
arg3
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted
powershell .\test.ps1 arg1 'arg2 with space' arg3

or

powershell .\test.ps1 arg1 """arg2 with space""" arg3

I think you should try to avoid using double quotes as cmd already uses them too and therefore it's a little hard to predict what exactly PowerShell will get. Remember that this gets passed through two shells and therefore two layers of escaping/quoting.

PowerShell itself doesn't make much of a distinction between single and double quotes. At least in this context the difference is irrelevant.

share|improve this answer

OK. I think I got it:

@pushd "C:\myscripts" powershell .\test.ps1 arg1 'arg2 with space' arg3 @popd

single quote char instead of double one. Maybe they mean different thing in PS.

share|improve this answer
    
They don't. But they do mean different things for cmd. –  Joey Nov 26 '09 at 17:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.