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I'm doing a simple Zoo application to understand oriented object concepts in Java.

My model is as follow: 1) A Zoo has a number of Cages 2) A Cage has a a mixture of Feline, Primate or Bird 3) An Animal can eat, sleep or drink 4) Feline extends Animal (Do extra Feline stuff) 5) Primate extends Animal (Do extra Primate stuff) 6) Bird extends Animal (Do extra Bird stuff)

The problem:

While it's pretty easy to handle x number of cages in a zoo (ArrayList of Cage), I'm struggling with the Animals in Cage. I found out that I need to have an ArrayList of Object.

So far so good, but when I try to obtain my animal back and have him scratch a post, it's not a Feline anymore, it's an Object.

public class Cage{

        private String name;
        private ArrayList<Object> animals = new ArrayList<Object>();

        public Cage(String name){
            this.name = name;
        }

        public void addFeline(String name){
            Feline newFeline= new Feline(name);
            this.animals.add(newFeline);
        }

        public void addPrimate(String name){
            Primate newPrimate= new Primate(name);
            this.animals.add(newPrimate);
        }

        public void addBird(String name){
            Bird newBird= new Bird(name);
            this.animals.add(newBird);
        }

        public void removeAnimal(int index){
            this.animals.remove(index);
        }

        public Object getAnimal(int index){
            Object myAnimal = this.animals.get(index);
            return myAnimal;
        }
    }

And the way I call it:

Zoo myZoo = new Zoo("My Zoo");
myZoo.addCage("Monkey Exhibit");
Cage myCage = myZoo.getCage(0);
myCage.addFeline("Leo");
Object MyAnimal = myCage.getAnimal(0);

The Question: How can I turn Object back into instance of class Feline so it can Scratch a Post?

share|improve this question
1  
Convert or cast? It makes a difference. –  EJP Aug 4 '13 at 23:50

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think the best way to approach this problem would be using the Strategy design pattern.

Feline, Primate and Bird should implement an interface Animal. The Cage would then have a method public void addAnimal(Animal animal);

The object creation for Feline, Primate and Bird should be outside of Cage.

I have put together some code if this can help. I would design the application similar to something below.

Behaviours should be encapsulated using interfaces. e.g. EatingBehaviour

public interface Animal {
    public String getName();
}
public interface EatingBehaviour {
    public void howManyTimes();
}

public class RealLionEatingBehaviour implements EatingBehaviour{
    @Override
    public void howManyTimes() {
        System.out.println("I eat once a day");
    }
}

public class ToyLionEatingBehaviour implements EatingBehaviour {
    @Override
    public void howManyTimes() {
        System.out.println("I never eat! I am a toy lion.");
    }
}

public abstract class Feline implements Animal{
    public abstract void scratchPost();
    private EatingBehaviour eatingBehaviour;
    public EatingBehaviour getEatingBehaviour() {
        return eatingBehaviour;
    }
    public void setEatingBehaviour(EatingBehaviour eatingBehaviour) {
        this.eatingBehaviour = eatingBehaviour;
    }
}

public class Lion extends Feline {
    private String name;
    public String getName() {
        return this.name; 
    }
    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name; 
    }
    Lion (String name) {
        this.name=name;
    }
    public void scratchPost(){
        System.out.println(getName() + " Lion Scratching Post!");
    }   
}

public class AnimalFactory {
    public static Animal getAnimalInstance(String type, String name){
        Animal animal=null;
        if ("lion".equalsIgnoreCase(type)) {
            animal = new Lion(name);
        }
        return animal;
    }
}

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Cage {
    private List<Animal> animals = new ArrayList<Animal>();
    public void addAnimal(Animal animal) {
        animals.add(animal);
    }
    public void removeAnimal(int index){
        this.animals.remove(index);
    }
    public Animal getAnimal(int index){
        return this.animals.get(index);
    }   
}

public class Zoo {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        Cage cage = new Cage();
        Animal animal = null;
        animal = AnimalFactory.getAnimalInstance("Lion", "Sweety");
        cage.addAnimal(animal);
        Animal animalFromCage = cage.getAnimal(0);
        if (animalFromCage instanceof Feline) {
            Feline feline = (Feline) animalFromCage;
            feline.setEatingBehaviour(new RealLionEatingBehaviour());
            feline.scratchPost();
            feline.getEatingBehaviour().howManyTimes();
            feline.setEatingBehaviour(new ToyLionEatingBehaviour());
            feline.getEatingBehaviour().howManyTimes();
        }
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Will you then need to adjust the interface each time we add an animal that have more different behaviors? –  PM 77-1 Aug 4 '13 at 23:42
    
That's how I understand it's going to be actually. Does that mean that my class Animal is gone or is the interface animal implementing class Animal? Oo' –  ndefontenay Aug 4 '13 at 23:47
    
If we think of designing an application with the whole of animal kingdom then Animal would be probably the root interface. At the moment I can think of having a big tree of interface hierarchy. Even a Feline cannot be a fully implemented class. A Lion would be. I think a proper use of the Strategy design pattern would be the answer. –  atsurti Aug 4 '13 at 23:51
    
In your example, where would you place methods like eat, sleep and drink which is common to all animals, if animal is now an interface and not a class anymore? –  ndefontenay Aug 5 '13 at 4:22
    
The variable name will then belong to each class rather than a super class animal. If my animals have more properties, such as Fatigue, Hunger, Aggressiveness, would it still make sense to have an interface for it? I would need to be able to set those values at least. Do you think that they should be reproduced in each specialized animal classes? –  ndefontenay Aug 5 '13 at 4:54

Use a cast:

Object myAnimal = myCage.getAnimal(0);
Feline f = (Feline) myAnimal;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the super quick answer. What would happen if in fact the class is not Feline? Is there any best practices related to doing this? –  ndefontenay Aug 4 '13 at 23:26
    
Of course, this assumes that you know that the animal at position 0 is a Feline. –  Ted Hopp Aug 4 '13 at 23:26
    
Then a ClassCastException will be thrown. The best practice here: make a list of Animal interface, and make all the concrete animals implement it. Use polymorphism to make each animal do the appropriate action. –  Óscar López Aug 4 '13 at 23:27
    
Notice that it's not a good idea to create a list of Object with different concrete types, that'll eventually lead to problems and it's a design smell. Better make sure that all the elements in the list are of the same type, as suggested in the previous comment –  Óscar López Aug 4 '13 at 23:29
2  
I'll research interfaces. I want to do it properly. No shortcuts. –  ndefontenay Aug 4 '13 at 23:46
private List<Animal> animals = new ArrayList<Animal>();
    public void findAnimal(int index) {
        Animal myAnimal = animals.get(index);
        if (myAnimal instanceof Feline) {
            Feline feline = (Feline) myAnimal;
            //do the work with Feline
        } else if (myAnimal instanceof Primate) {
            //do the work with Primate
        }
        // continue with the other types.
    }

this will avoid a unexpected classcast exception. Since you know the type use the super type (Animal) in the Arraylist instead fo Object. if it is Obejct you can add anything to the List.

share|improve this answer
    
This makes no sense. What's the point of checking and casting to Feline, etc. if Animal is the return type? –  Paul Bellora Aug 5 '13 at 0:29
    
@PaulBellora I edited the post. –  Philip PJ Aug 5 '13 at 0:35

You should use an ArrayList<? extends Animal> instead of ArrayList<Object>. You would then cast a return value to the appropriate subclass of Animal.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not much better than using Object as the base class. –  Ted Hopp Aug 4 '13 at 23:27
    
Can you give an example of how it applies because when I change Object for <? extends Animal>, the addFeline, addPrimate and addBird methods start failing with "? Capture in Animal cannot be applied to Feline" –  ndefontenay Aug 4 '13 at 23:31
    
Try just Animal instead of ? extends Animal. –  tbodt Aug 4 '13 at 23:37

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