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In C++ where we use pass by reference we reference the address of whatever it is that we passed from the argument to the parameter of the function which is essentially a pointer right? So while they are essentially the same thing, alias and all, doesnt a pointer require memory space as well? So shouldnt whatever we have in a parameter function let us call B point to the memory location of whatever the argument was that was passed let us call A which in turn is the memory location of our value( since A passed the memory location of our value as the argument)?

In java where we use pass by value we make a copy of the address of whatever it was we passed(the reference to the object for example).

So in the end i'm not truely seeing the difference between pass by value and pass by reference. Pass by value allocates space in memory for the original passed argument and the copy that both point to the value and pass by reference passes the memory location of our value as the argument which the parameter(the pointer which allocates space in the memory ) in our function uses to point to the value.

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What's your question? –  Tony Ennis Aug 5 '13 at 3:45
    
For pass by reference does the parameter in our function require memory allocation. It's a pointer right? So how is that different than pass by value which also needs memory allocation from the copy of the memory address of the value? I mean for both pass by reference and pass by value you have two variables that points to the value. –  user2644819 Aug 5 '13 at 3:46
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In Java you pass a reference by value. In C++ there is more alternatives. You can pass by value or reference; you can even pass a pointer to the object (which is not the same as a reference) by value or reference. Java's references are more like C++ pointers. C++ references are fundamentally different to pointers. –  Loki Astari Aug 5 '13 at 4:11
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In C++ where we use pass by reference we reference the address of whatever it is that we passed from the argument to the parameter of the function which is essentially a pointer right?

No. A reference is an alias (ie an alternative name) for an existing variable.
But at the assembly level your implementation may put the address of the referenced variable in an address register (or something similar) for the called function to use (if that is what you mean).

But for simplification you can think of it as a pointer that is automatically de-referenced (that is what I did when I first started). But when you get into the language references are actually fundamentally different from pointers.

So while they are essentially the same thing, alias and all, doesnt a pointer require memory space as well?

A pointer at the C++ level requies space (as it is addressable). You can take the address of a pointer. Fundamentally a reference does not require space (as you can't take its address). At an implementation level it may or may not have a physical memory location depending on how the compiler is implementing it.

So shouldnt whatever we have in a parameter function let us call B point to the memory location of whatever the argument was that was passed let us call A

It would have been nice if you had explained the above with a code example. But I think I understand. Assuming the function is not inlined then any parameter passed as reference needs some form of link back to the original object (as references always fundamentally refer to live objects). So how does it do. Compiler implementation detail (so you should not care). But probably a pointer on the stack or maybe just an address in an address register.

which in turn is the memory location of our value( since A passed the memory location of our value as the argument)?

Maybe or not. References do not have a physical location at the language level. So the compiler can play lots of nice little tricks with that.

In java where we use pass by value we make a copy of the address of whatever it was we passed(the reference to the object for example).

In Java you pass references by value. But Java references are fundamentally just pointers at a memory location. So you are passing a pointer by value. Which is one technique to use. Luckily C++ does not limit you to a single technique.

You can pass parameters by value or reference. You can even pass a pointer to an object by value or reference. So a couple of interesting techniques to use depending on the situation.

So in the end i'm not truely seeing the difference between pass by value and pass by reference.

Maybe that is because you are thinking about java references (which are passed by value).

In C++. If you pass by value, you are creating a new object that is passed as the parameter (which means you make a copy of the original, which can cost). If you pass by reference you are passing an alias to an object. So when you interact with the object you are modifying the original object.

 int inc(int val)     // pass by value
 {
     return ++val;    // increment the passed value and return as a result.
 }

 int incref(int& val) // pass by reference
 {
     return ++val;    // increment the reference.
                      // Since the reference is an alias this increment affects the
                      // original object. The result is returned.
 }

 void code()
 {
       int x = 5;
       int y = inc(x);  // x =5 and y = 6

       int a = 8;
       int b = incref(a); // a = 9 and b = 9
 }  

Pass by value allocates space in memory for the original passed argument and the copy that both point to the value and pass by reference passes the memory location of our value as the argument which the parameter(the pointer which allocates space in the memory ) in our function uses to point to the value.

Sorry I lost that.

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I think i understand. My question should have actually been more specifically pass by value versus pass by reference for objects. So you said that in C++ a reference may or may not actually have a physical memory space but if it does how is that different than pass by value for objects? because we are passing a reference to the object as an argument which is the memory location of our object. In pass by value it would make a copy and in pass by reference if it does have physical memory space how are the two different? They would both have two memory space allocation pointing to the object –  user2644819 Aug 5 '13 at 4:39
    
@user2644819: You have to remember that the word reference means completely different things in C++ and Java. In the above code where I show value and reference it makes no difference with the type of the object. I could have used std::string instead of int and the meaning does not change. –  Loki Astari Aug 5 '13 at 4:43
    
Pass by value. means you make a copy of the object and pass the copy to the function. Any actions on the object only affect the local copy. –  Loki Astari Aug 5 '13 at 4:44
    
Pass by reference. means you pass an alternative name of the object to the function. Any actions on the local object affect the original object (as the reference is just an alternative name). –  Loki Astari Aug 5 '13 at 4:45
    
Hmm i dont understand the difference. Arent they both a memory location? If so in pass by value it's in a variable while in pass by reference we have our parameter pointing to the memory location that our argument gave. You said:"you pass an alternative name of the object to the function" Do they have the same address in our memory? –  user2644819 Aug 5 '13 at 4:48
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Honest-to-god pass-by-value makes a copy of the variable's value and passes that to the function. This is usually done by pushing the value directly onto the stack. There is no way for the called function to modify the original value.

example:

a = 5
double(a); <-- but this is pass-by-value
print a
end

function double(x) <-- x is a variable with a value of 5
    x = 2*x;
    print x;
    return x;

In the example above, the value of 5 is passed into double(). x in the function becomes 10, and 10 is printed. The function returns, and 5 is printed. Since a's value (not its address) was passed to the double(), where is no way for double() to change the value of a.

Had we passed a pointer to a (pass by reference), it would have not been a problem to change the value of a.

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In pass by value the value in the address is calculated and passed at run time. but in pass by reference no value is determined only an address is passed to the function you are reading the value yourself and making changes directly in the memory location -not to the value that is passed to you as in pass by value- this is very low level and can result in problems because if one or more programs are performing operations on the memory location at the same time then the may be ambiguity.That is one of the reasons java doesn't support pointers.

In pass by value the data in the memory location is not changed while your function is performing operations. Because it is performing operations on a copy of it. Some thing like multithreading in java.

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I guess my question should really be pass by value for passing objects in which case we are passing the reference of that object which is essentially the memory location of that object and pass by reference which to me seems like the same thing because you are also passing a memory address. So if what i said is true while i know that the pass by value makes a copy of that argument we passed which is the memory location, is there memory allocation for passing by reference? –  user2644819 Aug 5 '13 at 4:26
    
I guess my question should really be pass by value for passing objects in which case we are passing the reference of that object which is essentially the memory location of that object and pass by reference which to me seems like the same thing because you are also passing a memory address. So if what i said is true while i know that the pass by value makes a copy of that argument in the parameter of the function that we passed which is the memory location of our object, is there memory allocation for passing by reference? It's a pointer in the parameter pointing to the memory location? Edited –  user2644819 Aug 5 '13 at 4:34
    
pass by value and pass by reference are both the same where using some memory for 'passing' is concerned.If there is a variable x = 10; and if its address is 100. pass by value will pass 10 and pass by reference will pass 100.It is only that you know whether the coming value is an integer or an address and you use it accordingly.But in both cases some data is stored somewhere and the function is reading it. –  Anuswadh Aug 5 '13 at 5:43
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