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my question is simple, but I can't find it on google, so here I am.

Basically, as an example, I am reading in a bunch of integers until EOF from an input file. I used fgetc to check, but then it moves the file pointer to the address of the 2nd integer. How can I check for EOF in this while loop without moving the file pointer when it checks?

Keep in mind I will be doing something much more complex with this loop than scanning in integers. Also, don't mention my use of fscanf rather than fgets, I know. Its just a simple example to show you what I mean.

while(fgetc(ifp) != EOF)
{

    fscanf(ifp, "%d", &test);
    printf("%d\n", test);
}

If the input file has integers 1-10 for example, the above code would print:

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Missing the 1!

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4  
Because fgetc(ifp) will consume a character –  Alter Mann Aug 5 '13 at 5:31

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

fgetc Returns the character currently pointed by the internal file position indicator of the specified stream. The internal file position indicator is then advanced to the next character.Using do{ }while(); will solve your problem.

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This works, but why? –  Karim Elsheikh Aug 5 '13 at 5:40
    
because it is do{}while(); which performs first and tests later. –  Dayal rai Aug 5 '13 at 5:41
    
keep in mind that the call to fgetc() will gobble up one of the whitespace characters separating the integers; while it does work. this smells iffy to me... –  Christoph Aug 5 '13 at 5:50

For various reasons, it's impossible to determine if EOF has been reached without actually performing a prior read from the file.

However, using a seperate function call to do this is a bad idea, even if you were to use ungetc() to put back the character you tried to read.

Instead, check the return value of the call to fscanf() itself:

while(fscanf(ifp, "%d", &test) == 1)
{
    printf("%d\n", test);
}
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You should consider EOF conditions to be an implementation detail. What's really important here is whether fscanf has successfully returned a value.

while(fscanf(ifp, "%d", &test) == 1) {
    printf("%d\n", test);
}

On the other hand, this feels like one of those times where it makes sense to put the logic in the middle of the loop.

while(1) {
    int ret = fscanf(ifp, "%d", &test);
    if (ret != 1)
        break;
    printf("%d\n", test);
}

Especially for debugging, it can be nice to split things up into separate statements with variables that can be inspected.

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How about simply:

while (fscanf (ifp, "%d", &test) != EOF)
    printf("%d\n", test);
share|improve this answer
    
doesn't work: fscanf() may return EOF, which is a truthy value –  Christoph Aug 5 '13 at 5:45
    
@Christoph thanks for the correction, I've edited my answer –  verbose Aug 5 '13 at 5:50

fgetc(ifp) advance the file pointer, hence skipping your first integer

Instead Use: -

while(1)
{

    if(fscanf(ifp, "%d", &test)!=1) 
         break;
    printf("%d\n", test);
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, check this –  Alter Mann Aug 5 '13 at 5:33
    
@DavidRF check the context of that, OP case is not too specific –  P0W Aug 5 '13 at 5:37
    
while(!feof(ifp)) it's wrong because (in the absence of a read error) it enters the loop one more time than the author expects. If there is a read error, the loop never terminates. –  Alter Mann Aug 5 '13 at 5:39
    
Could you give me an example of a read error that would cause an infinite loop? I'm just curious. –  Karim Elsheikh Aug 5 '13 at 5:42
    
@KarimElsheikh stackoverflow.com/a/5432517/1606345 –  Alter Mann Aug 5 '13 at 5:44

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