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enter image description hereI was trying to see how a shell scripts work and how to run them, so I toke some sample code from a book I picked up from the library called "Wicked Cool Shell Scripts"

I re wrote the code verbatim, but I'm getting an error from Linux, which I compiled the code on saying:

'd.sh: line 3: syntax error near unexpected token `{

'd.sh: line 3:`gmk() {

Before this I had the curly bracket on the newline but I was still getting :

'd.sh: line 3: syntax error near unexpected token

'd.sh: line 3:`gmk()

#!/bin/sh
#format directory- outputs a formatted directory listing 
gmk()
 {
#Give input in Kb, output converted to Kb, Mb, or Gb for best output format
    if [$1 -ge 1000000]; then
        echo "$(scriptbc -p 2 $1/1000000)Gb"
    elif [$1 - ge 1000]; then
        echo "$$(scriptbc -p 2 $1/1000)Mb"
    else
        echo "${1}Kb"
        fi
}

    if [$# -gt 1] ; then 
        echo "Usage: $0 [dirname]" >&2; exit 1
    elif [$# -eq 1] ; then 
        cd "$@"
        fi

    for file in *

    do 
        if [-d "$file"] ; then
            size = $(ls "$file"|wc -l|sed 's/[^[:digit:]]//g')
        elif [$size -eq 1] ; then
            echo "$file ($size entry)|"
        else
            echo "$file ($size entries)|"
    fi
        else
            size ="$(ls -sk "$file" | awk '{print $1}')"
            echo "$file ($(gmk $size))|"
    fi
    done | \
      sed 's/ /^^^/g' |\
      xargs -n 2 |\
      sed 's/\^\^\^/ /g' | \
      awk -F\| '{ printf "%39s %-39s\n", $1, $2}'
      exit 0

    if [$#-gt 1]; then 
        echo "Usage :$0 [dirname]" >&2; exit 1
    elif [$# -eq 1]; then 
        cd "$@"
    fi

    for file in *
        do
            if [ -d "$file" ] ; then
                size =$(ls "$file" | wc -l | sed 's/[^[:digit:]]//g')
            if [ $size -eq 1 ] ; then
                echo "$file ($size entry)|"
            else
                echo "$file ($size entries)|"
                fi
            else
                size ="$(ls -sk "$file" | awk '{print $1}')"
                echo "$file ($(convert $size))|"
                fi
done | \
    sed 's/ /^^^/g' | \
    xargs -n 2 | \
    sed 's/\^\^\^/ /g' | \
    awk -F\| '{ printf "%-39s %-39s\n", $1, $2 }'

    exit 0

the code as it appears in the book

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2  
This is badly broken. To begin with put spaces around [ and ]. –  devnull Aug 5 '13 at 6:09
    
When you say you "compiled" the code, what exactly do you mean by that? –  Gabe Aug 5 '13 at 6:13
    
@devnull I put the spaces like you suggested –  user2644360 Aug 5 '13 at 6:16
    
@Gabe Compile is probably not the correct word, just so used to saying it. I tried to run the script using what my other linux book suggest /bin/sh filename I aslo tried to run it using chmod +x filename then typing the filename in but kept getting a path error, which the book said may happen, in which they suggested PATH=$PATH then running the filename but it still didn't work –  user2644360 Aug 5 '13 at 6:21
    
Did you type in the code to a Linux program? –  Gabe Aug 5 '13 at 6:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

sh is very sensitive to spaces. In particular assignment (no spaces around =) and testing (must have spaces inside the [ ]).

This version runs, although fails on my machine due to the lack of scriptbc.

You put an elsif in a spot where it was supposed to be if.

Be careful of column alignment between starts and ends. If you mismatch them it will easily lead you astray in thinking about how this works.

Also, adding a set -x near the top of a script is a very good way of debugging what it is doing - it will cause the interpreter to output each line it is about to run before it does.

#!/bin/sh
#format directory- outputs a formatted directory listing
gmk()
{
#Give input in Kb, output converted to Kb, Mb, or Gb for best output format
    if [ $1 -ge 1000000 ]; then
        echo "$(scriptbc -p 2 $1/1000000)Gb"
    elif [ $1 -ge 1000 ]; then
        echo "$(scriptbc -p 2 $1/1000)Mb"
    else
        echo "${1}Kb"
    fi
}

if [ $# -gt 1 ] ; then
    echo "Usage: $0 [dirname]" >&2; exit 1
elif [ $# -eq 1 ] ; then
    cd "$@"
fi

for file in *
do
    if [ -d "$file" ] ; then
        size=$(ls "$file"|wc -l|sed 's/[^[:digit:]]//g')
        if [ $size -eq 1 ] ; then
            echo "$file ($size entry)|"
        else
            echo "$file ($size entries)|"
        fi
    else
        size="$(ls -sk "$file" | awk '{print $1}')"
        echo "$file ($(gmk $size))|"
    fi
done | \
  sed 's/ /^^^/g' |\
  xargs -n 2 |\
  sed 's/\^\^\^/ /g' | \
  awk -F\| '{ printf "%39s %-39s\n", $1, $2}'
  exit 0
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this actually worked after I was able to do some adjustments to my directory. It did output some errors about the script bc, but it still outputted correctly –  user2644360 Aug 5 '13 at 17:16

By the way, with respect to the book telling you to modify your PATH variable, that's really a bad idea, depending on what exactly it advised you to do. Just to be clear, never add your current directory to the PATH variable unless you intend on making that directory a permanent location for all of your scripts etc. If you are making this a permanent location for your scripts, make sure you add the location to the END of your PATH variable, not the beginning, otherwise you are creating a major security problem.

Linux and Unix do not add your current location, commonly called your PWD, or present working directory, to the path because someone could create a script called 'ls', for example, which could run something malicious instead of the actual 'ls' command. The proper way to execute something in your PWD, is to prepend it with './' (e.g. ./my_new_script.sh). This basically indicates that you really do want to run something from your PWD. Think of it as telling the shell "right here". The '.' actually represents your current directory, in other words "here".

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