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The Objective:
There is a login form where the user types in the username and password and clicks on a login button (type="submit"). I am trying to identify if the return value from the PHP code has the pattern "FailText" in it. If yes, display the message in div "signinAlert", else (if login is successful) redirect to the user's home page.

The Code:

<form id="loginForm" name="loginForm" method="POST">
    <table>
        <tr>
            <td><input class="input_home" type="text" name="username" id="email" size="30" placeholder="E-mail Address" /></td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td><input class="input_home" type="password" name="password" id="password" size="30" maxlength="12" placeholder="Password" /></td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td style="text-align: right;"><a href="#" title="Forgot Password">Forgot Password?</a>&nbsp;&nbsp;<input type="submit" class="Button" value="Sign In" id="login" onclick="return DisplayLoginError()"; /></td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</form>

Here is my JavaScript function.

function DisplayLoginError()
{
    var loginForm = document.loginForm;

    var dataString = $(loginForm).serialize();

    $.ajax ({
        type: 'POST',
        url: 'login.php',
        data: dataString,
        success: function(data){
            var result = data;
            var patt1=new RegExp("FailText");
            if (patt1.test(result))
            {
                $('#signinAlert').html(data);
                $('#signinAlert').css('display','block');
            }
            else
            {
                window.location = "home/";
            }           
        }
    });
    return false;
}

The question: I strongly believe that the above JavaScript code is very sloppy (because of the RegExp evaluation when the login attempt is a success). Is there any other way to achieve the objective? By the way, the above method works on ALL major browsers.

Please advise. I am a total newbie with AJAX. Many thanks.

share|improve this question
    
what is the value returned by the server in case of a failed login –  Arun P Johny Aug 5 '13 at 7:11
    
Don't abuse placeholder like that, it isn't a <label>. –  Quentin Aug 5 '13 at 7:15
    
@ArunPJohny After verifying that the user's credentials were correct, I was setting a few session variables and redirecting to the user's home page -- header( 'Location: home/' ); In other words, if I didn't have the RegExp check, the user's home page was loading in the div "signinAlert" and not redirecting. –  KalC Aug 5 '13 at 7:19
    
@Quentin Will keep it in mind. Thanks. –  KalC Aug 5 '13 at 7:19
1  
I normally just echo out a json_encode()'ed array, in your case from login.php. Something like echo json_encode("message"=>"There was a problem logging you in", "type"=>"error"); - Then in your javascript: var result = $.parseJSON(data); $('#signinAlert').html(result.message); –  Adam Tomat Aug 5 '13 at 7:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is my preferred option. Not saying it's perfect but it's what I've been using for a while. Just means that all your error messages are stored in PHP rather than in your JS files (which I prefer). Also note, the below code is untested.

Edit: Just a note as to why I prefer the errors in PHP instead of JS. I normally have a table with my errors in, meaning I can output the error code and message just by saying oh this is ERR-002, output the message associated with it. When somebody phones up with ERR-002, I only need to check the DB (and not trawl through code).

On your login.php page, you can return a json encoded array that javascript can decode. So in your php:

<?php 

    $arrResult = array("message" => "Could not log you in", "type" => "error");
    // Or the success one:
    // $arrResult = array("message" => "You're logged in", "type" => "success"); 
    echo json_encode($arrResult);

?>

Then you can decode this message and use it as an object in javascript, like so:

function DisplayLoginError()
{
    var loginForm = document.loginForm;

    var dataString = $(loginForm).serialize();

    $.ajax ({
        type: 'POST',
        url: 'login.php',
        data: dataString,
        success: function(strResponse){
            var $objResponse = $.parseJSON(strResponse);

            if ($objResponse.type == "success")
            {
                 window.location = "home/";
            }
            else
            {
                 $('#signinAlert').html($objResponse.message).css('display','block');
            }           
        }
    });
    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! This is exactly what I was looking for. Was trying to absorb your earlier answer by googling "JSON tutorial". LOL. This helped a lot. –  KalC Aug 5 '13 at 7:30

It works great but sometimes if the data have leading or trailing spaces it will not match the pattern so its good practice to use data=$.trim(data);before matching pattern

share|improve this answer
    
You're right. However in this case, I would know if login failed "FailText" would be there as is (it's a css class I am using). However to make things leaner, I have added the trim function. –  KalC Aug 5 '13 at 7:26

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