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I wrote a program to accept 5 strings from user and then display them sorted alphabetically using bubble-sort algorithm. But, the strings are being displayed in the same order as they were entered. Please tell me what am I doing wrong here.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

void sSwap(char *s1, char *s2);

int main(){
    char *sList[5],input[100],*p;
    int i,j;

    puts("Enter 5 strings");
    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
        gets(input);
        sList[i] = (char *)malloc(strlen(input)+1);
        strcpy(sList[i],input);
    }

    puts("");

    for(i=3;i>=0;i--){
        for(j=0;j<=i;j++){
            if(strcmp(sList[j],sList[j+1])>0)
                sSwap(sList[j],sList[j+1]);
        }
    }

    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
        puts(sList[i]);
    return 0;
}

void sSwap(char *s1, char *s2){
    char *temp;
    temp = s1;
    s1 = s2;
    s2 = temp;
}
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2  
your swap function is incorrect. It does nothing. –  Mitch Wheat Aug 5 '13 at 7:32
2  
Don't use gets, it's unsafe, use fgets instead. –  Yu Hao Aug 5 '13 at 7:34
2  
Your sSwap fuction is a NOOP. It needs to take char ** arguments, not just char *. –  Lee Daniel Crocker Aug 5 '13 at 7:35
1  
@sh94 gets doesn't have a fixed limit on what it can "get," meaning you're just asking for a buffer overflow. –  Dennis Meng Aug 5 '13 at 7:37
1  
@sh94 See here stackoverflow.com/a/17737109/1009479 –  Yu Hao Aug 5 '13 at 7:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

as you were told, your swap function getting values and swap them by value, meaning that when you leave the function the changes will not be saved and old values will return. try this

void sSwap(char **s1, char **s2);

int main(){
    char *sList[5],input[100],*p;
    int i,j;

    puts("Enter 5 strings");
    for(i=0;i<5;i++){
        gets(input);
        sList[i] = (char *)malloc(strlen(input)+1);
        strcpy(sList[i],input);
    }

    puts("");

    for(i=3;i>=0;i--){
        for(j=0;j<=i;j++){
            if(strcmp(sList[j],sList[j+1])>0)
                sSwap(&sList[j],&sList[j+1]);
        }
    }

    for(i=0;i<5;i++)
        puts(sList[i]);
    return 0;
}

void sSwap(char **s1, char **s2){
    char *temp;
    temp = *s1;
    *s1 = *s2;
    *s2 = temp;
}
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1  
Shouldn't those be char **s? –  Dennis Meng Aug 5 '13 at 7:39
    
Yes, they should. –  verbose Aug 5 '13 at 7:40
    
@DennisMeng you are corect –  No Idea For Name Aug 5 '13 at 7:40
    
Working fine now, but why was the earlier one not working, the array contained addresses of strings, and that was what being passed, so why double pointer? –  Shubham Aug 5 '13 at 7:46
    
@sh94 because a char* is a pointer to [an array of] char[s] (a string), a char ** is a pointer to [an array of] string[s]. you needed to pass the strings by reference to be able to have the modification show outside of your sSwap function –  Daboyzuk Aug 5 '13 at 7:49

The qsort function is in the stdlib.h

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

you define the number of elements in array

#define n_array sizeof(array)/sizeof(const char *)

and the comparison function

static int compare (const void * a, const void * b)
{
    return strcmp (*(const char **) a, *(const char **) b);
}

and then in main you should use, replacing sSwap

qsort (array, n_array, sizeof (const char *), compare);
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2  
While true, doesn't really address why the OP's code is wrong. –  Dennis Meng Aug 5 '13 at 7:45

One of your problem is that when you swap two strings, you doesn't check if you have to swap it with the new neighboors of this string.

So I would do a recursive function to solve this. Like if you swap, you call the function (let's say void sort(char **list, int index)) :

sort(sList, 0) //to start from beginning and check the new order

If the strings are equals or in the right order, like :

    sort(sList, currentListIndex);

So you would have :

void sort(char **sList, int index) {
     if (sList[index+1]) {
         if (strcmp(sList[index],sList[index+1]) > 0){
             sSwap(sList, index); // you can swap direclty on the tab
             return sort(sList, 0);
         }
         return sort(sList, index+1);
     }
     return void;
}

sort(sList, 0);

It's been a while i didn't do C so maybe pointers are wrong, but it's the idea

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