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I've been asked to develop the consumer (client) side to a producer (server), where the producer creates processes, waits until the consumer has read shared memory and deleted processes, then passes control back to the producer for the killing of processes and the shutting down of the shared memory block.

I've researched the difference between sleep and wait, and realise that as soon as fork() is called, the child process begins running.

The below code is after the creation of processes and checks if they're parent processes. If they are, they wait(0). *Now for my question, how do I know where the code in the consumer starts to be executed, and how do I pass it back? *

else if(pid > 0)
                {
                    wait(0);
                }

Below can be seen the main loop the producer uses.

int noToCreate = atoi(argv[2]); // (user inputs on cmd line "./prod 20 10 5" - 20 size of shared mem, 10 process to be created, 5 processes to be deleted)

while(*memSig != 2)
    {
        while(*memSig == 1)   // set memsignature to sleep while..
        {
            sleep(1);
        }

        for(B = 0; B < noToCreate; B++)     
        {
            pid = fork();

            if(pid == -1)
            {
                perror("Error forking");
                exit(1);
            }
            else if(pid > 0)
            {
                wait(0);
            }
            else
            {
                srand(getpid());

                while(x == 0)
                {
                    if(*randNum == 101)
                    {
                        *randNum = rand() % (100 - 

1) + 1;
                        *pidNum = getpid();

                        printf("priority: %d 

Process ID: %d \n", *randNum, *pidNum);

                        x = 1;
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        *randNum++;
                        *pidNum++;
                    }
                }
                exit(0);
            }
        } /* Closes main for loop */

        if(*memSig == 0)
        {
            *memSig = 1;
        }
    } /* Closes main while loop */

Thanks a bunch guys :)

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3 Answers 3

wait make parent blocked until any child end .You can use waitpid let parent wait specific child.

When a child process end, it will set a signal SIG_CHILD.

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The pid is zero for the child process after the fork, so you are in the child process at your call to the srand function.

The other pid is that for the child process which allows he original thread to wait for the child to finish. If you wish to pass data between the processes consider using a pipe. A popen call returns two file descriptors, one to write end and the other to the read end. Set this up before the fork and the two processes can communicate.

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wait makes the parent wait for any child to terminate before going on (preferably use waitpid to wait for a certain child), whereas sleep puts the process to sleep and resumes it, as soon as the time passed as argument is over.
Both calls will make the process block.
And it is NOT said that the child will run immediately, this is indeterminate behavior!

If you want to pass data between producer and consumer, use pipes or *NIX sockets, or use the return-value of exit from the child if a single integer is sufficient.

See man wait, you can get the return value of the child with the macro WEXITSTATUS.

#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int
main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    pid_t cpid, w;
    int status;

   cpid = fork();
    if (cpid == -1) {
        perror("fork");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }

   if (cpid == 0) {            /* Code executed by child */
        printf("Child PID is %ld\n", (long) getpid());
        if (argc == 1)
            pause();                    /* Wait for signals */
        _exit(atoi(argv[1]));

   } else {                    /* Code executed by parent */
        do {
            w = waitpid(cpid, &status, WUNTRACED | WCONTINUED);
            if (w == -1) {
                perror("waitpid");
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
            }

           if (WIFEXITED(status)) {
                printf("exited, status=%d\n", WEXITSTATUS(status));
            } else if (WIFSIGNALED(status)) {
                printf("killed by signal %d\n", WTERMSIG(status));
            } else if (WIFSTOPPED(status)) {
                printf("stopped by signal %d\n", WSTOPSIG(status));
            } else if (WIFCONTINUED(status)) {
                printf("continued\n");
            }
        } while (!WIFEXITED(status) && !WIFSIGNALED(status));
        exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply(ies). I'm not supposed to need to use pipes, rather, the producer and consumer should read what is in shared memory, and depending on a pointer flag set in memory, perform their various tasks. If you wish to see it, I could attach the full producer.c code in my above answer, would that help? –  viKK Aug 5 '13 at 9:25
    
I must admit I am not quite sure what your goal is here... Usually, producer/consumer goes like "Producer produces while there is space and consumer consumes while there are products"... Do you know how to handle shared memory? –  bash.d Aug 5 '13 at 9:28
    
Thanks for the reply, again. An example of what I need to make can be found under "Example two processes comunicating via shared memory: shm_server.c, shm_client.c" @ cs.cf.ac.uk/Dave/C/node27.html#SECTION002730000000000000000 –  viKK Aug 5 '13 at 11:33
    
Do you get along with that example? I am not experienced in shm, but you should definitely look for a way to use IPC, because busy-waiting as in while(*memSig == 1){ sleep(1); } is fatal for performance and Looks not so good, either. –  bash.d Aug 5 '13 at 11:37
    
I find the concept of creating a segment, attaching it, then putting information in there easy enough to understand. I just don't understand what needs to be done in which file. Any tips on how I could test it? I'm not familiar with debugging in Unix and I want to find out what my actual program does. –  viKK Aug 5 '13 at 11:44

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