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I went through many threads but i could not get the answer yet .

I am setting an image to the imageView programmatically as

imageview.setBackgroundResource(R.Drawable.image);

if i set image as the above , will the image get cleared if i give

imageview,setImageDrawable(null) ;

what does imageview.setBackgroundDrawable(null) meant ?

What is the difference between

imageview,setImageDrawable(null) ;

and

imageview,setImageBitmap(null) ;

and

imageview.setBackgroundDrawable(null);
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

setBackgroundDrawable() is deprecated. You should use setBackground instead.

Basically the difference is the parameter. In setImageBitmap() you have to pass a Bitmap object. In setImageDrawable() you have to pass a Drawable object. setBackground just change the background of the imageview.

The imageview can have a background and a image content. If you are defining the background and want to clear the imageview, you should use setBackground(null).

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This is true answer –  Mert Şimşek Aug 5 '13 at 11:00
    
setBackgroundResource(0) is the best option. from the documentation. setBackground Require ApI 16 or greater.. see here developer.android.com/reference/android/view/… –  Nepster Jul 4 at 6:18

Did you tried with :

imageview.setImageResource(android.R.color.transparent);
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setImageBitmap(Bitmap bm) : Sets a Bitmap as the content of this ImageView

setImageDrawable(Drawable drawable): Sets a drawable as the content of this ImageView

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i am asking the difference of setting it to null . i want to clear the image . –  VIGNESH Aug 5 '13 at 10:41
    
imageview.setImageDrawable(null); worked for me –  diva Aug 5 '13 at 10:48

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