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Hello people thanks for the help so far. I Have a regex for finding a date in a given string and it does not seem to working. Could someone tell me what I am doing wrong? The code goes something like

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("^(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])[- /.](0[1-9]|1[012])[- /.](19|20)\\d\\d(?:,)$");
Matcher match = pattern.matcher(text1);

List<String> removable1 = new ArrayList<String>();             
while(match.find()) {
    removable1.add(match.group());
}

I know that there is a date "7/2/2013" contained in the string text1 which is not being written to the list removable1. Any help is appreciated thanks in advance.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your pattern does not allow for single-digit days and months. Make the leading 0 optional:

^(0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])[- /.](0?[1-9]|1[012])[- /.](19|20)\\d\\d(?:,)$

Also, I'm not sure what the trailing comma does. And additionally, you say "contained in the string", but ^ and $ anchor the pattern to the start and end. So you might want to remove these, if you want to find dates:

(0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])[- /.](0?[1-9]|1[012])[- /.](19|20)\\d\\d

Finally, if you want to make sure that both date separators are the same character, you can do this:

(0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])([- /.])(0?[1-9]|1[012])\\2(19|20)\\d\\d

Finally, for some optimization, avoid capturing where you don't need it (and potentially make the century optional:

(?:0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])([- /.])(?:0?[1-9]|1[012])\\1(?:19|20)?\\d\\d
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much that worked. – newtoprogramming Aug 5 '13 at 11:10
    
Hi one simple question. Say the date is surrounded by a couple of strings before and after and I want to match the regex pattern between those particular strings, would this work [^string1 string2 (0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])([- /.])(0?[1-9]|1[012])\\2(19|20)\\d\\d string3 string4$] – newtoprogramming Aug 5 '13 at 13:10
    
@newtoprogramming yes it should (provided those square brackets are not part of your pattern). why don't you just try it? – Martin Büttner Aug 5 '13 at 18:14
    
this is the exact line for which I am trying to write a regex "commented on 7/2/2013 (version1.0)" for which, I tried "commented on (?:0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])([- /.])(?:0?[1-9]|1[012])\\1(?:19|20)?\\d\\d (version 1.0)" and also "(?<=commented\\son\\s(?:0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])([- /.])(?:0?[1-9]|1[012])\\1(?:19|20)?\\d\\d?=\\s(version 1.0))" neither detects my pattern. Can you help me. I do not know what I am doing wrong. – newtoprogramming Aug 6 '13 at 11:44

Try this

String text1="07/02/2013";
Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("^(0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])[- /.](0[1-9]|1[012])[- /.](19|20)\\d\\d$");
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3  
Are you sure changing the input is a valid solution? ^^ I think this is about matching the given input and not finding an input matched by the pattern. – Martin Büttner Aug 5 '13 at 10:38

regex you used is not correct. Task section to match day for example

0[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])

This regex means 0 should be used as prefix if day is 1~9.

To fix this issue , you should add ? which means preceding item is optional. So you can change your regex string to

(0?[1-9]|[12][0-9]|3[01])[- /.](0?[1-9]|1[012])[- /.](19|20)\d\d

In future, you can use regular expression tester to debug those issues. They are useful and helps to save time. For example, http://regex.uttool.com , http://regexpal.com/

share|improve this answer
    
For Java problems, the OP should rather use regexplanet.com. I don't know about regex.uttool.com, but regexpal uses JavaScript's regex flavor. – Martin Büttner Aug 5 '13 at 11:20
    
Both of these two are using javascript regex flavor. – Tiger Xu Aug 6 '13 at 1:07

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