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The Challenge

The shortest code by character count to output Ulam's spiral with a spiral size given by user input.

Ulam's spiral is one method to map prime numbers. The spiral starts from the number 1 being in the center (1 is not a prime) and generating a spiral around it, marking all prime numbers as the character '*'. A non prime will be printed as a space ' '.

alt text

Test cases

Input:
    2
Output:
    * *
      *
    *  

Input:
    3
Output:
    *   *
     * * 
    *  **
     *   
      *  

Input:
    5
Output:
        * *  
     *     * 
    * *   *  
       * * * 
      *  ** *
     * *     
    *   *    
     *   *   
    *     *

Code count includes input/output (i.e full program).

share|improve this question
    
I am sorry in advanced if this seems biased toward a certain group of languages - this is not by design. Also, Happy thanks giving! –  LiraNuna Nov 26 '09 at 21:43
4  
I was expecting a turkey-printing golf. =[ –  strager Nov 26 '09 at 21:44
    
Arrgh..I guess it's time to learn J. Is it acceptable to have an upper bound for the input/grid size, say 99 or whatever? –  gnibbler Nov 26 '09 at 22:34
1  
good grief ... one of the weirdest code golf challenges yet. –  ldigas Nov 27 '09 at 1:21
3  
I like the dancing figure with input 5. Is it just me or is it my browser? (Or a runner at the start) –  stefaanv Nov 27 '09 at 14:04
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19 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Golfscript - 92 Characters

~.(:S+,:R{S\-:|;R{S-:$|>' *'1/[|$.|]2/@:d|~)$<!^=~:$;:y.*4*$-y-)2d*$y-*+:$,{)$\%!},,2==}%n}%

97 characters
~.(:S+,:R{S\-:|;R{S-:$|>' *'1/[|$.|]2/@:d|~)$<!^=~:$;:y.*4*$-y-)2d*$y-*+.1=3*+:$,2>{$\%!},!=}%n}%

99 characters
~.(:S+,{S-}%:R{~):|;R{:$|>' *'1/[|$.|]2/@:d|~)$<!^=~:$;:y.*4*$-y-)2d*$y-*+.1=3*+:$,2>{$\%!},!=}%n}%

100 characters
~:S.(+,{S(-}%:R{~):|;R{:$|>' *'1/[|$.|]2/@:d|~)$<!^=~:$;:y.*4*$-y-)2d*$y-*+.1=3*+:$,2>{$\%!},!=}%n}%

101 characters
~:S.(+,{S(-}%:R{~):v;R{:$v>:d;' *'1/[v$.v]2/v~)$<!d^=~:$;:y.*4*$-y-)2d*$y-*+.1=3*+:$,2>{$\%!},!=}%n}%

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2  
+1 I don't really speak golfscript, but the algorithm looks familiar –  hirschhornsalz Nov 27 '09 at 23:44
    
@drhirsch: Yes, I think your formula for directly calculating the value at each location is very clever :) –  gnibbler Nov 28 '09 at 0:20
add comment

Python - 203 Characters

  _________________________________________________________
 /x=input();y=x-1;w=x+y;A=[];R=range;k,j,s,t=R(4)          \
| for i in R(2,w*w):                                        |
|  A+=[(x,y)]*all(i%d for d in R(2,i))                      |
|  if i==s:j,k,s,t=k,-j,s+t/2,t+1                           |
|  x+=j;y+=k                                                | 
| for y in R(w):print"".join(" *"[(x,y)in A]for x in R(w))  |
 \_________________________________________________________/
        \   ^__^
         \  (oo)\_______
            (__)\       )\/\
                ||----w |
                ||     ||


x=input();y=x-1;w=x+y
A=[];R=range;k,j,s,t=R(4)
for i in R(2,w*w): 
 A+=[(x,y)]*all(i%d for d in R(2,i))
 if i==s:j,k=k,-j;s,t=s+t/2,t+1
 x+=j;y+=k
for y in R(w):print"".join(" *"[(x,y)in A]for x in R(w))

How it works
The idea is to fill A with x,y coords that need to be printed as '*'
The algorithm starts at the cell corresponding to 2, so the special case of testing 1 for primality is avoided.
x,y is the cell of interest
j,k keep track of whether we need to inc or dec x or y to get to the next cell
s is the value of i at the next corner
t keeps track of the increment to s

all(i%d for d in R(2,i)) does the primality check

The last line is rather clumsy. It iterates over all the cells and decides whether to place a space or an asterisk

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21  
+1 for presentation –  mizipzor Nov 27 '09 at 11:00
17  
I spent a good 10 seconds wondering if the cow actually was legal syntax –  Jimmy Nov 27 '09 at 23:22
    
Well... looks interesting. So how does it work? (I don't have a clue of python) –  hirschhornsalz Nov 27 '09 at 23:34
    
@drhirsch: I added an explanation, I am still debating whether this sort of algorithm in golfscript can be shorter than the one I already have. –  gnibbler Nov 28 '09 at 0:38
    
+1 for the cow! –  Mk12 Dec 23 '09 at 21:50
add comment

MATLAB: 182 167 156 characters

Script ulam.m:

A=1;b=ones(1,4);for i=0:(input('')-2),c=b(4);b=b+i*8+(2:2:8);A=[b(2):-1:b(1);(b(2)+1:b(3)-1)' A (b(1)-1:-1:c+1)';b(3):b(4)];end;disp(char(isprime(A)*10+32))

And formatted a little nicer:

A = 1;
b = ones(1,4);
for i = 0:(input('')-2),
  c = b(4);
  b = b+i*8+(2:2:8);
  A = [b(2):-1:b(1); (b(2)+1:b(3)-1)' A (b(1)-1:-1:c+1)'; b(3):b(4)];
end;
disp(char(isprime(A)*10+32))

Test cases:

>> ulam
2
* *
  *
*  
>> ulam
3
*   *
 * * 
*  **
 *   
  *  
>> ulam
5
    * *  
 *     * 
* *   *  
   * * * 
  *  ** *
 * *     
*   *    
 *   *   
*     *
share|improve this answer
8  
Challenge asks for a full program. –  LiraNuna Nov 27 '09 at 8:10
5  
Heck, can we vote to outlaw Matlab? ;) –  Carl Smotricz Nov 27 '09 at 8:26
2  
@LiraNuna: The first version was a full program, but I updated it to a new version anyway. –  gnovice Nov 27 '09 at 16:19
1  
@Carl: Aww, that's not a very fun attitude. :) –  bcat Nov 27 '09 at 22:32
3  
isprime() isn't a huge advantage only 1 char less that implementing one in golfscript and 15 chars less than the Python implementation - although those only work for numbers > 1 –  gnibbler Nov 27 '09 at 23:11
show 4 more comments

C, 208 206 201 200 199 196 194 193 194 193 188 185 183 180 176 Bytes

(if newlines are removed):

main(int u,char**b){
for(int v,x,y,S=v=**++b-48;--v>-S;putchar(10))
for(u=-S;++u<S;){
x=u;y=v;v>-u^v<u?:(x=v,y=u);
x=4*y*y-x-y+1+2*(v<u)*(x-y);
for(y=1;x%++y;);
putchar(y^x?32:42);}}

Compiled with

> gcc -std=c99 -o ulam ulam.c

Warning. This program is slow, because is does a trial division up to 2^31. But is does produce the required output:

    * *
 *     *
* *   *
   * * *
  *  ** *
 * *
*   *
 *   *
*     *

In nicely formatted C and with redundant #includes:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    int u,v,x,y,d,S = atoi(argv[1]);

    /* v is the y coordinate of grid */
    for (v=S; v>=-S; --v)

        /* u is the x coordinate. The second operand (!putchar...) of the boolean or
         * is only ececuted a a end of a x line and it prints a newline (10) */
        for (u=-S; u<=S || !putchar(10); ++u) {

            /* x,y are u,v after "normalizing" the coordintes to quadrant 0
               normalizing is done with the two comparisions, swapping and and
               an additional term later */
            d = v<u;
            x=u;
            y=v;

            if (v<=-u ^ d) {
                x=v;
                y=u;
            }

            /* reuse x, x is now the number at grid (u,v) */
            x = 4*y*y -x-y+1 +2*d*(x-y);   

           /* primality test, y resused as loop variable, won't win a speed contest */
            for (y=2; y<x && x%y; ++y)
                 ;

            putchar(y!=x?' ':'*');
        }
}

It works by transforming the coordinates of the grid to the appropriate number and then performing the primality test, intead of drawing in a snake-like manner. The different equations for the four "quadrants" can be collapsed into one with swapping x and y and an additional term for "backward counting".

share|improve this answer
    
The primality test in the compacted version doesn't work with gcc 4.3.3. You can use y^x in the final ternary to get the char back. –  gnibbler Nov 27 '09 at 17:08
    
I just tested it with 4.3.4 and 4.4.2, both do work. Can you specify what the problem is? And thanks for the xor-tip ;-) –  hirschhornsalz Nov 27 '09 at 17:45
    
For 3-9, I think this is one off. ./a.out "2" shows the proper output for three. Two doesn't work, nor do double-digit numbers. –  ACoolie Nov 27 '09 at 18:24
    
ulam.pastebin.com/m5065ca86 I guess the x%y is getting calculated with the wrong value of y. Also seems to have the out-by one problem noted by ACoolie –  gnibbler Nov 27 '09 at 20:45
1  
+1 because the 1%-1 is plain evil –  gnibbler Nov 29 '09 at 22:37
show 9 more comments

Ruby 1.8.7, 194 chars

n=2*gets.to_i-1
r=n**2
l,c=[nil]*r,r/2
r.times{|i|l[c]=i+1;c=i==0||l[c-n]&&!l[c+1]?c+1:l[c-1]&&!l[c-n]?c-n:l[c+n]?c-1:c+n}
r.times{|i|print"1"*l[i]!~/^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$/?'*':' ',i%n==n-1?"\n":''}

For some reason, ruby1.9 wants another space on line 4:

r.times{|i|l[c]=i+1;c=i==0||l[c-n]&&!l[c+1]?c+1:l[c-1]&&!l[c-n]?c-n :l[c+n]?c-1:c+n}
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Python - 171

drhirsch's C ported to python.

S=input();R=range(-S+1,S)
for w in R:
 p="";v=-w
 for u in R:d=v<u;x,y=[(u,v),(v,u)][(w>=u)^d];x=4*y*y-x-y+1+2*d*(x-y);p+=" *"[(x>1)*all(x%f for f in range(2,x))]
 print p
echo 20 |python ulam.py 
      *     *   * *   *             *  
 *     * *     *   * *                 
*     * *                     *     *  
       * *     *   *           *     * 
                  *   * *   *          
 *               *   *       *   * *   
*     *   *           * *     *        
 *   * *     * *     *     *           
* *           *           *   *     * *
   *     *   *       *     *           
    *   *         *   * *   * * *      
 * *       *     *         * *   *     
      *     *   * *               *    
                   * *     *   *   * * 
*   *   *   * *   *       *   * *      
                   * *   *             
  *       *   * *     * * *     * * *  
   * * * * * * * *   *       *         
                  * * *           *    
             *   *  ** * * *   * * *   
      *       * * *                    
               *   *                   
    *   * *   * *   *   * *   *   * *  
 *     *   *   *     *     * *   *     
                *           *          
 *         * *     *   *   *       * * 
* *     *   *           *       *     *
   *     *     *   * *                 
              * *   *     *   *     *  
   * * * *         * *     *     * *   
      *   *           * *              
 *   * *     *     *   * *           * 
  * *       *         *       *     *  
             * *   * *         *     * 
          *   *     *     *         * *
       * *     *                 *     
*   *       *           *   *     *    
                             *     *   
*   * *   *     *           *          
share|improve this answer
    
the output doesn't look quite right to me –  cobbal Nov 27 '09 at 19:58
    
fixed it - the bottom right quadrant was wrong –  gnibbler Nov 27 '09 at 20:57
    
Imitation is the sincerest of flattery –  hirschhornsalz Nov 27 '09 at 23:49
    
@drsirsch: It's a decent advantage (in bytes) for the Python to be able build and print strings instead of having to use lists and then join with the print. –  gnibbler Nov 28 '09 at 0:25
    
Yes, that and other nice things like the more powerful assignment operators and generally less overhead. But the Python implementation is only 9 bytes ahead. And this may even shrink further, though I am slowly running out of ideas ;-) –  hirschhornsalz Nov 28 '09 at 2:16
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MATLAB, 56 characters

based on @gnovice solution, improved by using MATLAB's spiral function :)

disp(char(isprime(flipud(spiral(2*input('')-1)))*10+32))

Test Cases:

>> disp(char(isprime(flipud(spiral(2*input('')-1)))*10+32))
2
* *
  *
*  
>> disp(char(isprime(flipud(spiral(2*input('')-1)))*10+32))
3
*   *
 * * 
*  **
 *   
  *  
>> disp(char(isprime(flipud(spiral(2*input('')-1)))*10+32))
5
    * *  
 *     * 
* *   *  
   * * * 
  *  ** *
 * *     
*   *    
 *   *   
*     *
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J solution: 197 173 165 161 bytes (so far)
this does not use the method mentioned in the comments to the OP

p=:j./<.-:$g=:1$~(,])n=:<:+:".1!:1]3
d=:j.r=:1
(m=:3 :'if.y<*:n do.if.0=t=:<:t do.d=:d*0j1[t=:<.r=:r+0.5 end.m>:y[g=:y(<+.p=:p+d)}g end.')t=:2
1!:2&2(1 p:g){' *'
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My first code golf!

Ruby, 309 301 283 271 265 characters

s=gets.to_i;d=s*2-1;a=Array.new(d){' '*d}
e=d**2;p='*'*e;2.upto(e){|i|2.upto(e/i){|j|p[i*j-1]=' '}};p[0]=' '
s.times{|i|k=s-i-1;l=2*i;m=l+1;o=l-1
m.times{|j|n=j+k;a[k][n]=p[l**2-j];a[n][k]=p[l**2+j];a[k+l][n]=p[m**2-m+j]}
l.times{|j|a[j+k][k+l]=p[o**2+o-j]}}
puts a
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Python 2.x, 220C 213C 207C 204C 201C 198C 196C 188C

Special thanks to gnibbler for some hints in #stackoverflow on Freenode. Output includes a leading and trailing newline.

import math
v=input()*2
w=v-1
a=['\n']*w*v
p=w*v/2
for c in range(1,w*w):a[p]=' *'[(c>1)*all(c%d for d in range(2,c))];x=int(math.sqrt(c-1));p+=(-1)**x*((x*x<c<=x*x+x)*w+1)
print''.join(a)

(Python 3 compatibility would require extra chars; this uses input, the print statement and / for integer division.)

share|improve this answer
    
a[p]=' *'[(c>1)*all(c%d for d in r(2,c))] –  gnibbler Nov 27 '09 at 9:01
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Ruby - 158 Characters

Same algorithm as this one, just the prime test is different

p=(v=(w=gets.to_i*2)-1)*w/2-1
a='
'*v*w
d=0
(v*v).times{|i|a[p]="1"*(i+1)!~/^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$/?42:32;d=(a[p+(z=[w,-1,-w,1])[d-1]]<32)?(d-1):d%4;p+=z[d]}
puts a
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Haskell - 224 characters

(%)=zipWith(++)
r x=[x]
l 1=r[1]
l n=r[a,a-1..b]++(m r[a+1..]%l s%m r[b-1,b-2..])++r[d-s*2..d]where{d=(n*2-1)^2;b=d-s*6;a=d-s*4;s=n-1}
p[_]='*'
p _=' '
i n=p[x|x<-[2..n],n`mod`x==0]
m=map
main=interact$unlines.m(m i).l.read

i'm not the best at haskell so there is probably some more shrinkage that can occur here

output from echo 6 | runghc ulam.hs

*   *      
     * *   
* *     * *
 * *   *   
    * * *  
   *  ** * 
* * *      
 *   *     
* *   *   *
 *     *   
  *


this is a different algorithm (similar to @drhirsch's) unfortunately i cannot seem to get it below 239 characters

p[_]='*'
p _=' '
main=interact$unlines.u.read
i n=p[x|x<-[2..n],n`mod`x==0]
u(n+1)=map(map(i.f.o).zip[-n..n].replicate((n+1)*2-1))[n,n-1..(-n)]
f(x,y,z)=4*y*y-x-y+1+if z then 2*(x-y)else 0
o(u,v)=if(v> -u)==(v<u)then(v,u,v<u)else(u,v,v<u)
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First post! (oh wait, this isn't SlashDot?)

My entry for Team Clojure, 685 528 characters.

(defn ulam[n] (let [z (atom [1 0 0 {[0 0] " "}])
m [[0 1 1 0][2 -1 0 -1][2 0 -1 0][2 0 0 1][2 0 1 0]]
p (fn [x] (if (some #(zero? (rem x %)) (range 2 x)) " " "*"))]
(doseq [r (range 1 (inc n)) q (range (count m)) [a b dx dy] [(m q)]
s (range (+ (* a r) b))]
(let [i (inc (first @z)) x (+ dx (@z 1)) y (+ dy (@z 2))]
(reset! z [i x y (assoc (last @z) [x y] (p i))])))
(doseq [y (range (- n) (inc n))] (doseq [x (range (- n) (inc n))]
(print ((last @z) [x y]))) (println))))
(ulam (dec (.nextInt (java.util.Scanner. System/in))))---

Input:
5
Output:
    * *  
 *     * 
* *   *  
   * * * 
  *  ** *
 * *     
*   *    
 *   *   
*     *


Input:
10
Output:
        *   * *   *
 *     *         * 
  *   * *          
         * *     * 
  * *   *       *  
         * *   *   
*   * *     * * *  
 * * * *   *       
        * * *      
   *   *  ** * * * 
    * * *          
     *   *         
*   * *   *   * *  
 *   *     *     * 
      *           *
 * *     *   *   * 
  *           *    
     *   * *       
    * *   *     *
share|improve this answer
    
If gnibbler learns J, I'm toast. Until then... :) –  Carl Smotricz Nov 27 '09 at 0:47
1  
You don't need to print "Input:" and "Output:" in your solution. –  strager Nov 27 '09 at 1:47
3  
You should put a character count at the top. –  Vlad the Impala Nov 27 '09 at 2:32
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Not as beautiful as the previous C entry, but here's mine.

note: I'm posting because it takes a different approach than the previous one, mainly

  • there's no coordinate remapping
  • it gives the same results as the tests
  • it works with input > 9 (two digits - no -47 trick)

    enum directions_e { dx, up, sx, dn } direction;
    
    
    int main (int argc, char **argv) {
    	int len = atoi(argv[1]);
    	int offset = 2*len-1;
    	int size = offset*offset;
    	char *matrix = malloc(size);
    	int startfrom = 2*len*(len-1);
    	matrix[startfrom] = 1;
    	int next = startfrom;
    	int count = 1;
    	int i, step = 1;
    	direction = dx ;
    
    
    
    for (;; step++ )
    	do { 
    		for ( i = 0 ; i &lt; step ; i++ ) {
    			switch ( direction ) {
    				case dx:
    					next++;
    					break;
    				case up:
    					next = next - offset;
    					break;
    				case sx:
    					next--;
    					break;
    				case dn:
    					next = next + offset;
    			}
    			int div = ++count;
    			do {
    				div--;
    			} while ( count % div );
    			if ( div &gt; 1 ) {
    				matrix[next] = ' ';
    			}
    			else { 
    				matrix[next] = '*';
    			}
    			if (count &gt;= size) goto dontusegoto;
    		}
    		direction = ++direction % 4;
    	} while ( direction %2);
    
    dontusegoto: for ( i = 0 ; i < size ; i++ ) { putchar(matrix[i]); if ( !((i+1) % offset) ) putchar('\n'); } return 0; }

which, adequately translated in unreadable C, becomes 339 chars.

compile with: gcc -o ulam_compr ulam_compr.c works on osx

i686-apple-darwin9-gcc-4.0.1 (GCC) 4.0.1 (Apple Inc. build 5465)

and debian Lenny.

main(int a,char**v){
    int l=atoi(v[1]),o=2*l-1,z=o*o,n=2*l*(l-1),c=1,i,s=1,d;
    char*m=malloc(z);
    m[n]=1;
    for(;;s++)do{
    		for(i=0;i<s;i++){
    			if(d==0)n++;
    			else if(d==1)n-=o;
    			else if(d==2)n--;
    			else n+=o;
    			int j=++c;
    			while(c%--j);
    			if(j>1)m[n]=' ';else m[n]='*';
    			if(c>=z)goto g;
    		}d=++d%4;}while(d%2);
g:for(i=0;i<z;i++){
    	putchar(m[i]);
    	if(!((i+1)%o))putchar('\n');
    }
}

Here is some output:

    $ ./ulam_compr 3
*   *
 * * 
* **
 *   
  *  

    $ ./ulam_compr 5
    * *  
 *     * 
* *   *  
   * * * 
  * ** *
 * *     
*   *    
 *   *   
*     *
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for showing some balls and using C. But to be honest, those two chars from using *-48 instead of atoi() wouldnt make such a big difference. But you can always discount the newlines and whitespaces, we don't need to rely on such unmanly nonsense such as intendation like those python guys. –  hirschhornsalz Nov 27 '09 at 23:58
    
@drhirsh: That's why so much of the Python golf ends up crammed onto the same line as the for loop :) –  gnibbler Nov 28 '09 at 0:57
    
@drhirsch: well the difference with the -48 I think it's being made if I use more than one digit, doesn't it? I'd have to subtract it to every char given in argv[1]. Thanks, however, for the compliment. It was my first code golf, and I would not call myself a programmer. Ps: the whitespaces are at a minimum (the count was made removing all tabs and newlines). Code here shows spaces instead of tabs. –  lorenzog Nov 28 '09 at 9:46
    
You can save two characters by leaving out the named 'a' argument (since it isn't referenced anywhere). Also, technically none of the whitespace is required. –  johanatan Nov 23 '12 at 2:29
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Python - 176

This one starts with a big long list of newline characters and replaces all of them except for the ones that are needed at the end of the lines.

Starting at the centre, the algorithm peeps around the lefthand corner at each step. If there is a newline character there, turn left otherwise keep going forward.

w=input()*2;v=w-1;a=['\n']*v*w;p=w/2*v-1;d=0;z=[w,-1,-w,1]
for i in range(v*v):a[p]=' *'[i and all((i+1)%f for f in range(2,i))];d=d%4-(a[p+z[d-1]]<' ');p+=z[d]
print"".join(a)

Python - 177
Using a string avoids "join" but ends up one byte longer since the string is immutable

w=input()*2;v=w-1;a='\n'*v*w;p=w/2*v-1;d=0;z=[w,-1,-w,1]
for i in range(v*v):a=a[:p]+' *'[i and all((i+1)%f for f in range(2,i))]+a[p+1:];d=d%4-(a[p+z[d-1]]<' ');p+=z[d]
print a
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Python, 299 characters:

from sys import *
def t(n):
 if n==1:return ' '
 for i in range(2,n):
  if n%i==0:return ' '
 return '*'
i=int(stdin.readline())
s=i*2-1
o=['\n']*(s+1)*s
c=1
g=2
d=0
p=(s+2)*(i-1)
for n in range(s**2):
 o[p]=t(n+1);p+=[1,-s-1,-1,s+1][d%4];g-=1
 if g==c:d+=1
 if g==0:d+=1;c+=1;g=2*c
print ''.join(o)
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use i=input() instead of importing sys –  gnibbler Nov 27 '09 at 4:50
    
you can also use d+=g==c to same some bytes –  gnibbler Nov 27 '09 at 6:30
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Lua, 302 characters

s=...t={" "}n=2 function p()for j=2,n-1 do if n%j==0 then n=n+1 return" "end
end n=n+1 return"*"end for i=2,s do for k=#t,1,-1 do t[k+1]=t[k]..p()end
t[1]=""for k=1,i*2-1 do t[1]=p()..t[1]end for k=2,#t do t[k]=p()..t[k]end
t[#t+1]=""for k=1,i*2-1 do t[#t]=t[#t]..p()end end print(table.concat(t,"\n"))

Output from lua ulam.lua 6:

*   *      
     * *   
* *     * *
 * *   *   
    * * *  
   *  ** * 
* * *      
 *   *     
* *   *   *
 *     *   
  *        
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Python 284 266 256 243 242 240 char

I wanted to try recursion, I'm sure it may be heavily shortened:

r=range
def f(n):
 if n<2:return[[4]]
 s=2*n-1;z=s*s;c=[r(z-2*s+2,z-3*s+2,-1)];e=1
 for i in f(n-1):c+=[[c[0][0]+e]+i+[c[0][-1]-e]];e+=1
 c+=[r(z-s+1,z+1)];return c
for l in f(input()):print''.join(' *'[all(x%f for f in r(2,x))]for x in l)

edited under suggestion in comments

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This can be golfed down to 242 at least –  gnibbler Nov 28 '09 at 1:24
    
I shortened it a bit more, where do you think it could be shortened more? –  Andrea Ambu Nov 28 '09 at 8:55
    
You can use tab instead of 2 spaces for indenting. You can refactor to just have one return. Use all(x%f for f in range(2,x)) ( there is a trick you will need to do this as it will count 1 as a prime ) instead of importing gmpy. i think rewriting the last line to use a for loop will be shorter too –  gnibbler Nov 28 '09 at 12:59
    
Yeah very nice consideration, i'm still wondering how to use just one return and gain one more char –  Andrea Ambu Nov 28 '09 at 14:50
    
aaaargh it was a \n in the end of the file, argh! down to 242 now, thanks! Maybe it can be shortened even more using indexes more wisely, I'm not sure yet though. –  Andrea Ambu Nov 28 '09 at 14:53
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Mathematica 243

l = Length; t = Table; f = Flatten;
h@m_ := With[{x = l@m[[1]], y = l@m}, f[{{Reverse@t[w + y + (x y), {w, x + 2}]}, 
  t[f[{(x y) + x + y + 2 + w, m[[w]], (x y) + y - w + 1}], {w, y}], 
  {t[2 + y + x + y + w + (x y), {w, x + 2}]}}, 1]];
m_~g~z_ := Nest[h, m, z] /. {_?PrimeQ -> "\[Bullet]", _Integer -> ""};
  Grid[{{1}}~g~#, Frame -> All] &

Usage

13 windings:

Grid[{{1}}~g~#, Frame -> All] &[13]

Ulam

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