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Is there a way to get battery information from the Android SDK? Such as battery life remaining and so on? I cannot find it through the docs.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

You can register an Intent receiver to receive the broadcast for ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED: http://developer.android.com/reference/android/content/Intent.html#ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED. The docs say that the broadcast is sticky, so you'll be able to grab it even after the moment the battery state change occurs.

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This is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks a lot. –  Jeremy Edwards Dec 2 '09 at 2:15
    
No problem. I know how hard the Android SDK docs can be to navigate sometimes. –  Jarett Dec 2 '09 at 14:30
2  
Can you post some sample code for this. I'm not sure how to receive a broadcast intent. –  Jeremy Edwards Dec 21 '09 at 5:59

Here is a quick example that will get you the amount of battery used, the battery voltage, and its temperature.

Paste the following code into an activity:

@Override
public void onCreate() {
    BroadcastReceiver batteryReceiver = new BroadcastReceiver() {
        int scale = -1;
        int level = -1;
        int voltage = -1;
        int temp = -1;
        @Override
        public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent) {
            level = intent.getIntExtra(BatteryManager.EXTRA_LEVEL, -1);
            scale = intent.getIntExtra(BatteryManager.EXTRA_SCALE, -1);
            temp = intent.getIntExtra(BatteryManager.EXTRA_TEMPERATURE, -1);
            voltage = intent.getIntExtra(BatteryManager.EXTRA_VOLTAGE, -1);
            Log.e("BatteryManager", "level is "+level+"/"+scale+", temp is "+temp+", voltage is "+voltage);
        }
    };
    IntentFilter filter = new IntentFilter(Intent.ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED);
    registerReceiver(batteryReceiver, filter);
}

On my phone, this has the following output every 10 seconds:

ERROR/BatteryManager(795): level is 40/100 temp is 320, voltage is 3848

So this means that the battery is 40% full, has a temperature of 32.0 degrees celsius, and has voltage of 3.848 Volts.

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Thanks for the sample code! I looked into the documentation of BatteryManager but had no idea how to use it. –  phunehehe Apr 29 '11 at 2:15
3  
This is a great example, but why you logging it on "error" level? –  GetUsername Jun 29 '11 at 7:11
    
@GetUsername There's no particular reason for error-level logging other than personal preference. For logging like this that I remove before publishing my app, I like to log at the error level so it is easy to see the logging in the sea of logcat output. –  plowman Jun 29 '11 at 17:15
    
Voltage levels actually drop as that battery drains? –  raidfive Dec 20 '11 at 23:32
    
@raidfive Surprisingly enough, yes. This explains why flashlights dim as their batteries are exhausted. –  plowman Jan 5 '12 at 22:48

I m doing that in a scheduler, I get trouble with the unregisterReceiver, I first place it in onDestroy, was not a good idea. Now the unregisterReceiver is at the end of the BroadcastReceiver , and it works perfectly. thanks for this code plowman.

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I needed to have a monitor on the battery and check the Level and the status. I am developing on MonoForAndroid, so here is what I came up with. I am putting it here in case somebody have a similar requirement. (I have tested this and works nicely).

try
{
    var ifilter = new IntentFilter(Intent.ActionBatteryChanged);
    Intent batteryStatusIntent = Application.Context.RegisterReceiver(null, ifilter);
    var batteryChangedArgs = new AndroidBatteryStateEventArgs(batteryStatusIntent);
    _Battery.Level = batteryChangedArgs.Level;
    _Battery.Status = batteryChangedArgs.BatteryStatus;
}
catch (Exception exception)
{
    ExceptionHandler.HandleException(exception, "BatteryState.Update");
    throw new BatteryUpdateException();
}

namespace Leopard.Mobile.Hal.Battery
{
    public class AndroidBatteryStateEventArgs : EventArgs
    {
        public AndroidBatteryStateEventArgs(Intent intent)
        {
        Level = intent.GetIntExtra(BatteryManager.ExtraLevel, 0);
        Scale = intent.GetIntExtra(BatteryManager.ExtraScale, -1);
        var status = intent.GetIntExtra(BatteryManager.ExtraStatus, -1);
        BatteryStatus = GetBatteryStatus(status);
    }

    public int Level { get; set; }
    public int Scale { get; set; }
    public BatteryStatus BatteryStatus { get; set; }

    private BatteryStatus GetBatteryStatus(int status)
    {
        var result = BatteryStatus.Unknown;
        if (Enum.IsDefined(typeof(BatteryStatus), status))
        {
            result = (BatteryStatus)status;
        }
        return result;
    }
}
}


#region Internals
public class AndroidBattery
{
    public AndroidBattery(int level, BatteryStatus status)
    {
        Level = level;
        Status = status;
    }

    public int Level { get; set; }
    public BatteryStatus Status { get; set; }
}

public class BatteryUpdateException : Exception
{
} 
#endregion
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    public static String batteryLevel(Context context)
    {
        Intent intent  = context.registerReceiver(null, new IntentFilter(Intent.ACTION_BATTERY_CHANGED));   
        int    level   = intent.getIntExtra(BatteryManager.EXTRA_LEVEL, 0);
        int    scale   = intent.getIntExtra(BatteryManager.EXTRA_SCALE, 100);
        int    percent = (level*100)/scale;
        return String.valueOf(percent) + "%";
    }
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