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In short: I want to define the algorithm in the superclass which inherits into all subclasses, but I want to define the data (on which the algorithm operates) in the subclasses as instance variables, which come into being when I call the "new" method of the given classes. What is the standard way for doing this in Ruby?

My solution is (but I am not exactly sure this is the right way):

class A
   attr_accessor :var
   def initialize
     @var=nil #I dont know the actual value, it will be defined only in the more specific subclasses.
   end

   def process_data
      puts @var #simply puts it out
   end
end

#in my program all further classes are inherited form class A, the processing facility is inherited, only the data varies.

class B < A
   attr_accessor :var
   def initialize
     @var=10 #specific value for class B which is always 10, no need for example b=B.new(20)
   end
end

class C < A
   attr_accessor :var
   def initialize
     @var=20 #specific value for class C which is always 20, no need for example c=C.new(20)
   end
end

b=B.new
b.process_data #needs to print 10

c=C.new
c.process_data #needs to print 20
share|improve this question
    
I am confused about your requirement.. :) –  Arup Rakshit Aug 5 '13 at 13:42
    
I want to define my algorithm only once - in the superclass A, then it will be inhrited to all the subclasses B and C. The data on which the defined algorithm operates are specific for the classes B and C, and not known for the superclass A. Of cource my real classes contain more methods, some of them are overdefined in the subclasses, but this is the problematic part for me what I described above. –  Konstantin Aug 5 '13 at 13:46

2 Answers 2

What you have works. There's just some unneeded stuff in there:

Instance variables evaluate to nil if they are uninitialized and they spring into existence as soon as they are used, so your A#initialize method is unnecessary.

You override the A#var and A#var= methods in B and C with methods that do the exact same thing. There is no need for that, just get rid of the calls to attr_accessor in the definition of B and C.

You create var and var= accessor methods but you never use them. Either get rid of the call to attr_accessor or (preferably) use the accessor methods, i.e. use self.var = in initialize and puts var in process_data.

class A
  attr_accessor :var

  def process_data
    puts var #simply puts it out
  end
end

#in my program all further classes are inherited form class A, the processing facility is inherited, only the data varies.

class B < A
  def initialize
    self.var = 10 #specific value for class B which is always 10, no need for example b=B.new(20)
  end
end

class C < A
  def initialize
    self.var = 20 #specific value for class C which is always 20, no need for example c=C.new(20)
  end
end

b = B.new
b.process_data #needs to print 10

c = C.new
c.process_data #needs to print 20

[Note: your coding style was also off. Indentation is 2 spaces in Ruby, not 3.]

However, if the value of @var is always the same for all instances of B, then why do you need multiple instances of B?

Why not something like this:

class A
  attr_accessor :var

  def initialize(val)
    self.var = val
  end

  def process_data
    puts var #simply puts it out
  end
end

b = A.new(10)
b.process_data #needs to print 10

c = A.new(20)
c.process_data #needs to print 20
share|improve this answer
    
I really need class B and C because they contain more methods too, which are specific for them. And methods can be defined only for classes, so I need to define these classes separately. In my program there will be only one instance of all class, B and C, and no instance of class A, it is needed only for avoiding code duplication. –  Konstantin Aug 5 '13 at 14:24
    
Sorry, I am only a self made programmer, I learn it only at home. I never heard till now that indentation should contain a certain amount of spaces. –  Konstantin Aug 5 '13 at 14:30
    
@Konstantin Most Ruby programmers are self-taught. –  sawa Aug 5 '13 at 14:31

You are doing it in almost the right way. A minor point is that your A::initialize definition is redundant for two reasons:

  • An instance variable is initialized to nil automatically.
  • The initialize methods in the subclasses will override A::initialize when the subclass instances are created.

Also, the attr_accessor calls in the subclasses are redundant.


Now I seem to get what you wanted. You can use class-level instance variables.

class A
  def initialize
    @var=self.class.instance_variable_get(:@var)
  end
  def process_data
    puts @var
  end
end

class B < A
  @var = 10
end

class C < A
  @var = 20
end

B.new.process_data # => 10
C.new.process_data # => 20
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, you must be right, in fact I never want to access the instance variable "var" of the instances, it will be used only by the process_data method, I never will refer to them as "a.var" or "A.new.var". But: because they are specific to the given class and not the current instance (the initialize method has no arguments), wouldn't be better to make them a class variable, denoted @@var? There will be no more inheritance chain in my program, only one level of inheritance, and the superclass is always the class A which contain the algorithm, so enhances in the algorithm can be done easily. –  Konstantin Aug 5 '13 at 14:01

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