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I am wondering how compilers handle include statements. They used to say to me that include (in C++) litterly replaces the code of the file by that statement.

For as far as I know does a compiler generate a object file for every corresponding source file. So for example main.cpp generates main.o (And not all the included files .o's too.)


Q1:

Does an object file (related to it's corresponding source file) contain the class data of included files? (That is reserves space for objects of a specific class, and mayby also contains their methods in the object file?)


Q2:

I was wondering if a include statement in C++ make the compiler parse the whole file to be included, or only makes it look for class declarations in header files? And how do inline functions fit in here?


I hope you can help me! (again..:P)

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closed as too broad by nneonneo, RiaD, nijansen, gcochard, Lorenz Meyer Mar 7 at 5:02

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
So this is basically a python compile question? –  Jim Aug 5 '13 at 13:41
    
C, Python, and Java are all very, very different languages. #include, import module, and import com.package; are very different statements. –  nneonneo Aug 5 '13 at 13:42
    
@nneonneo Mmm Could you explain those differences? –  Christian Veenman Aug 5 '13 at 13:44
    
@Jim I made it a C++ question! Thanks for helping btw. –  Christian Veenman Aug 5 '13 at 13:46
1  
Oh, and C++ doesn't have import statements. Might want to edit that. –  nneonneo Aug 5 '13 at 13:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The complete answer to your quandries is the subject of large and thick books or a PhD thesis. It is almost impossible to conclusively answer your question in the format of SO.

Q1) Does an object file (related to it's corresponding source file) contain the class data of included files? (That is reserves space for objects of a specific class, and mayby also contains their methods in the object file?)

In general, an object file will contain the code generated for the methods and free functions, a bit of initialized data (global variables that are initialized with a value other than zero), some uninitialized data (global variables that haven't been given a value) and little else.

There are however many formats for object files, and they are not all the same.

[Variables declared as static are also considered "global" in the above statement].

Q2) I was wondering if a include statement in C++ make the compiler parse the whole file to be included, or only makes it look for class declarations in header files? And how do inline functions fit in here?

The #include "somefile" will have the same effect as if you opened "somefile", copied all of it, and pasted it into the source file at that place.

The reason inline functions need to be in header files is that they must be "visible" to the compiler at the point where they are called, or the compiler won't be able to place the generated code inline (in the place where the function is called).

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So it was a good question?(A) Thanks for the answer, I'll accept it. –  Christian Veenman Aug 5 '13 at 14:57
    
Depends on how you define "good question". For the SO format, probably no, since it can't be answered in a fairly short form without glossing over a lot of details that may be important (which I did). –  Mats Petersson Aug 5 '13 at 15:10

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