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I have to handle part numbers, what are alphanumeric strings. Part numbers are 14 characters long, but part structure (s.c. upper level components) numbers are shorter. In metadata conversion upper level part numbers need to be expanded to the full length of 14 characters with tailing zeros.

I came up with the following solution

my $number = "M30SA0000002"; # same upper level part number
my $len = 14;

if (length($number) < $len) {
  print "Number [$number] is smaller, length (" . length ($number) . ")\n";
  $number = sprintf("%-${len}s", $number);
  $number =~ tr/ /0/;
}
print "\New number [$number], length (" . length ($number) . ")\n"

Here's output

Number [M30SA0000002] is smaller, length (12)
New number [M30SA000000200], length (14)

While this produces desirable result, this fills bit awkward to execute this simple task in 2 lines. Is there any way to do it in one line? Shame that sprintf doesn't provide a way to expand string with any trailing characters.

Production environment is run on Windows Server machines, Perl version 5.14.2.1, no CPAN modules, only core modules available.

Edit: I've benchmark 4 solutions

use Benchmark qw(:all);
timethese(10000000, {
            'While' => sub { my $number = "M30SA0000002"; $number .= '0' while 14 > length $number; },
            'Repeat' => sub { my $number = "M30SA0000002"; $number .= '0' x (14 - length $number); },
            'Substring' => sub { my $number = "M30SA0000002"; $number = substr($number . "0" x 14, 0, 14); },
            'Sprintf' => sub { my $number = "M30SA0000002"; $number = sprintf("%-14s", $number); $number =~ tr/ /0/; },
});

Here's result:

Benchmark: timing 10000000 iterations of Repeat, Sprintf, Substring, While...
    Repeat:  2 wallclock secs ( 1.65 usr +  0.00 sys =  1.65 CPU) @ 6045949.21/s (n=10000000)
   Sprintf:  3 wallclock secs ( 3.90 usr +  0.00 sys =  3.90 CPU) @ 2564102.56/s (n=10000000)
 Substring:  3 wallclock secs ( 2.78 usr +  0.00 sys =  2.78 CPU) @ 3602305.48/s (n=10000000)
     While:  2 wallclock secs ( 2.81 usr +  0.00 sys =  2.81 CPU) @ 3561253.56/s (n=10000000)

Repetition solution seems to be fastest of them all.

share|improve this question
1  
String::Formatter, for when you want to extend sprintf and realise you can't. –  daxim Aug 5 '13 at 15:31
    
String::Formatter is not a core Perl module. I can't use CPAN modules or at least I need to justify it's usage, but I have to go through very long approval process. So I'll skip this one for sure. –  edufinn Aug 5 '13 at 15:39
    
What makes random code off the Web (Stack Overflow) okay, but not (CPAN) thousand-fold tested that's productively in use elsewhere? –  daxim Aug 5 '13 at 15:42
    
I don't have access to production environment and I cannot install there anything. Installations are done by other department. No much I can do. –  edufinn Aug 5 '13 at 15:47
    
I see, the deployment angle. You can almost always module copy code to have it deployed. That's more practical than reinventing the wheels badly and laboriously. –  daxim Aug 5 '13 at 15:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use the while modifier together with an "append" assignment:

$number .= '0' while 14 > length $number;

or do some math and use the repetition operator (thanks @loldop):

$number .= '0' x (14 - length $number);
share|improve this answer
2  
$number.='0'x(14 - length $number)? –  gaussblurinc Aug 5 '13 at 14:06
    
@loldop: Nice. Added as a possibility. –  choroba Aug 5 '13 at 14:09
    
Our program already have lots of loops. What can you say about provided solutions performance? –  edufinn Aug 5 '13 at 14:30
    
@edufinn: Benchmark. –  choroba Aug 5 '13 at 14:38
    
I've benchmark all solutions –  edufinn Aug 5 '13 at 15:28

One-step solution is to append a lot of 0's and chop off the ones you don't need:

$number = substr($number . "0" x 14, 0, 14);
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