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Does Slick works only with databases OR does it also work with Lists, XML and Json Can it also consume REST Services?

Response is really appreciated.

Edited: based on below responses:

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Slick is a Functional-Relational mapper and as such is meant to be used with databases. I'd advise you watch out if choosing slick for your orm of choice because it has brutal and expensive licensing for commercial databases such as oracle and ms sql however if you're hacking away on open source stacks it's fine. Scala has nice xml support without any additional libraries being needed.

eg this is perfectly legal syntax in scala without any dependencies:

scala> <test fart="stinky">hello</test>
res0: scala.xml.Elem = <test fart="stinky">hello</test>

There are several json libraries for scala now that can handle json for you. The lift one is relatively popular. I'd maybe look at json4s https://github.com/json4s/json4s

If you have xml data or json data in your database, you'd want to parse that data on retrieval. If you're looking to store documents like that, though, you may want to consider an actual document database instead such as mongodb. The reactive mongo library has a clear advantage over jdbc in being non-blocking. http://reactivemongo.org/

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No slick is working with database and it's not an ORM but rather very smart queries. What you are looking for is scala for comprehension and higher order functions. They are very much like LINQ. See here for example: scala collections

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Updated my answer in response to this as slick is a functional-relational mapper not orm. – JasonG Aug 5 '13 at 14:50

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