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Ok i have a WPF project in which i have 4 TexBlock. What i want is to change the Text of each TextBlock via Binding.

So far i have my XAML :

    <Grid>
    <Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
        <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
        <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
        <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
    </Grid.RowDefinitions>
    <TextBlock x:Name="First" Text="{Binding FirstString}" Grid.Row="0"/>
    <TextBlock x:Name="Second" Text="{Binding SecondString}" Grid.Row="1"/>
    <TextBlock x:Name="Third" Text="{Binding ThirdString}" Grid.Row="2"/>
    <TextBlock x:Name="Fourth" Text="{Binding FourthString}" Grid.Row="3"/>
</Grid>

And in my code i have :

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    public string FirstString { get; set; }
    public string SecondString { get; set; }
    public string ThirdString { get; set; }
    public string FourthString { get; set; }

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();    

        FirstString = "First";
        SecondString = "Second";
        ThirdString= "Third
        FourthString= "Fourth";
    }
}

But the Binding doesnt work at all. Am i doing something to wrong? Please help. Thanks in advance.

EDIT:

After following Chris Mantle suggestion looking at the debbuger (I had is set to Warning sor the Binding) i get the following error:

System.Windows.Data Information: 10 : Cannot retrieve value using the binding and no valid fallback value exists; using default instead. BindingExpression:Path=FirstString; DataItem=null; target element is 'TextBlock' (Name='First'); target property is 'Text' (type 'String')
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1  
Is there anything in the Output window? –  Chris Mantle Aug 5 '13 at 14:09
    
Nothing at all. And i cant find why. –  oimitro Aug 5 '13 at 14:11
    
Can you turn up your data binding information in the Output Window and see if there's any more detail? (Tools menu –> Options –> Debugging –> Output Window –> WPF Trace Settings –> Data Binding, set to something like Verbose or All) –  Chris Mantle Aug 5 '13 at 14:13
    
who is the datacontext of the window. this should be this. –  JSJ Aug 5 '13 at 14:26
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are a few things that are incorrect. The Binding markup will look at the object in the DataContext property of the control. This property inherits the DataContext from the declaring parent unless otherwise specified. Out of the box, this is null for a Window control.

There are two options for this problem. You can either set the DataContext explicitely in the code-behind or the XAML

// In XAML
<Window DataContext={Binding RelativeSource={RelativeSource Self}}>

or

// In the code-behind
DataContext = this;

Another problem is that the binding is applied at initialization. Initially, your properties are empty. After the InitializeComponent phase, the controls will "bind" to the properties (which are empty). When you set your properties afterward, the controls have no way to know it has changed. There are two mechanism to allow this. On the control level, you can make these properties as DependencyProperty or implement the INotifyPropertyChanged interface and raise the changes. If you want to go the INPC route, you can implement your properties and Window as such:

public partial class MainWindow : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private string firstString;
    private string secondString;
    private string thirdString;
    private string fourthString;

    public string FirstString
    {
        get { return firstString; }
        set
        {
            firstString = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("FirstString");
        }
    }

    public string SecondString
    {
        get { return secondString; }
        set
        {
            secondString = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("SecondString");
        }
    }

    public string ThirdString
    {
        get { return thirdString; }
        set
        {
            thirdString = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("ThirdString");
        }
    }

    public string FourthString
    {
        get { return fourthString; }
        set
        {
            fourthString = value;
            RaisePropertyChanged("FourthString");
        }
    }

    public MainWindow()
    {
        DataContext = this;
        InitializeComponent();

        FirstString = "First";
        SecondString = "Second";
        ThirdString = "Third";
        FourthString = "Fourth";
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged = delegate { };

    private void RaisePropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        var handlers = PropertyChanged;

        handlers(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
}
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there is no need to do this, as code is in behind the xaml, and it will notify automatically when context is change... –  Aaron Aug 5 '13 at 14:22
1  
@Arun I'm not following your logic. If the properties are not INPC and not Dependency Properties, a change to the property will not be reflected to the UI. In this simple case, setting the DataContext = this after setting the property will work because DataContext is a dependency property. But any further change in code will not be reflected. –  Simon Belanger Aug 5 '13 at 14:25
    
public partial class MainWindow : INotifyPropertyChanged, Thats it!!! –  oimitro Aug 5 '13 at 16:01
    
@oimitro This is a very contrived example and will work. But beware that it is far from best practice. You would usually have another object (that we call a View Model) that implements the interface and that object will be assigned to your View's (Window in this case) DataContext. You can look this CodeProject entry if you want to read more about the MVVM pattern in the context of WPF. –  Simon Belanger Aug 5 '13 at 16:08
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Unless specified otherwise, the path of the binding is relative to the DataContext of the element. In your case, I suspect you didn't specify a DataContext at all...

Since the properties are declared in the MainWindow class itself, the easiest fix is to add:

DataContext = this;

at the end of the constructor.

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yes same i going to answer –  Aaron Aug 5 '13 at 14:11
    
I used DataContext = this; but still nothing. –  oimitro Aug 5 '13 at 14:11
    
Move InitializeComponent(); to the bottom of your constructor, then you should at least see something. Nicolas is right, though. –  Golvellius Aug 5 '13 at 14:14
    
where your writing DataContext = this; move it to bottom –  Aaron Aug 5 '13 at 14:15
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Since your aren't notifying that FirstString, SecondString, ThirdString and FourthString changed, the change will not be reflected in the UI. You can either implement INotifyPropertyChanged, or deal with DependencieProperty

Set your Datacontext, too.

IMHO DependencyProperty is better for this use. Here is an example :

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
    #region Public
    public string FirstString
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(FirstStringProperty); }
        set { SetValue(FirstStringProperty, value); }
    }
    public string SecondString
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(SecondStringProperty); }
        set { SetValue(SecondStringProperty, value); }
    }
    public string ThirdString
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(ThirdStringProperty); }
        set { SetValue(ThirdStringProperty, value); }
    }
    public string FourthString
    {
        get { return (string)GetValue(FourthStringProperty); }
        set { SetValue(FourthStringProperty, value); }
    }

    #region Dependency Properties
    public static readonly DependencyProperty FirstStringProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("FirstString", typeof(string), typeof(MainWindow), new PropertyMetadata("default value"));
    public static readonly DependencyProperty SecondStringProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("SecondString", typeof(string), typeof(MainWindow), new PropertyMetadata("default value"));
    public static readonly DependencyProperty ThirdStringProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("ThirdString", typeof(string), typeof(MainWindow), new PropertyMetadata("default value"));        
    public static readonly DependencyProperty FourthStringProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("FourthString", typeof(string), typeof(MainWindow), new PropertyMetadata("default value"));
    #endregion
    #endregion

    public MainWindow()
    {
        InitializeComponent();    

        FirstString = "First";
        SecondString = "Second";
        ThirdString= "Third
        FourthString= "Fourth";

        this.DataContext = this;
    }
}
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I would suggest that you create another class MainWindowViewModel.

public class MainWindowViewModel
{
    public string FirstString { get; set; }
    public string SecondString { get; set; }
    public string ThirdString { get; set; }
    public string FourthString { get; set; }

    public MainWindowViewModel()
    {    
        FirstString = "First";
        SecondString = "Second";
        ThirdString= "Third
        FourthString= "Fourth";
    }
}

Then set the DataContext of the MainWindow object before calling show on the window class.

MainWindow wnd = new MainWindow();
wnd.DataContext = new MainWindowViewModel();
wnd.Show();

You can do this last bit by removing StartupUri="MainWindow.xaml" from your App.xaml and create and show the main window manually by overriding OnStartup in App.xaml.cs.

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@Sinon Belanger There is no InitializeComponent() method on the class MainWindowViewModel. –  Zenchovey Aug 5 '13 at 14:29
    
Oh. Sorry. Didn't realize it was a view model. Removing my comment. –  Simon Belanger Aug 5 '13 at 15:53
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it should be something like this to work,

<Grid>
            <Grid.RowDefinitions>
                <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
                <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
                <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
                <RowDefinition Height="*"/>
            </Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <TextBlock x:Name="First" Text="{Binding FirstString}" Grid.Row="0"/>
            <TextBlock x:Name="Second" Text="{Binding SecondString}" Grid.Row="1"/>
            <TextBlock x:Name="Third" Text="{Binding ThirdString}" Grid.Row="2"/>
            <TextBlock x:Name="Fourth" Text="{Binding FourthString}" Grid.Row="3"/>
        </Grid>

and c# code will be like,

public string FirstString { get; set; }
public string SecondString { get; set; }
public string ThirdString { get; set; }
public string FourthString { get; set; }

public MainWindow()
{
    InitializeComponent();    

    FirstString = "First";
    SecondString = "Second";
    ThirdString = "Third";
    FourthString= "Fourth";
    this.DataContext = this;  //here you set the context to current instance of window

}
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