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I have to write a programme where a turtle takes 90 degree turns, chosen randomly as left or right, around the screen, until it hits a wall, takes a 180 degree turn and goes back to walking around the screen. When it's hit the wall 4 times, the loop terminates. The problem I'm having is that when it bounces off the wall it just stops walking, and the loop has clearly terminated as I can close the window by clicking on it (wn.exitonclick). Here's the full programme:

import turtle
import random

def isInScreen(w,t):
    leftBound = w.window_width() / -2
    rightBound = w.window_width() / 2
    bottomBound = w.window_height() / -2
    topBound = w.window_height() / 2

    turtlex = t.xcor()
    turtley = t.ycor()

    stillIn = True

    if turtlex < leftBound or turtlex > rightBound or turtley < bottomBound or turtley > topBound:
        stillIn = False

    return(stillIn)

def randomWalk(t,w):
    counter = 0

    while isInScreen(w,t) and counter < 4:
        coin = random.randrange(0,2)
        if coin == 0:
            t.left(90)
        else:
            t.right(90)
        t.forward(50)

    t.left(180)
    t.forward(50)
    counter = counter+1

wn = turtle.Screen()
wn.bgcolor('lightcyan')

steklovata = turtle.Turtle()
steklovata.color('darkslategray')
steklovata.shape('turtle')

randomWalk(steklovata,wn)

wn.exitonclick()

I'm confused as to why it stops, considering once the turtle bounces back, its x and y coordinates meet the requirements for isInScreen(w,t) to be true and thus go back to walking. Any ideas?

EDIT: Accepted Sukrit's answer as it was the easiest to relate to what I'd already programmed and gave me a few pointers on other stuff, but Brian's answer was very useful too and I'd accept both if it was possible. Thanks a lot to both of you!

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Okay, so it looks like your while loop is failing the instant it is going outside of the screen, it bounces back, yes because it is outside that first while loop. If you try doing while counter <4, and inside that do the logic for wall bouncing, it should work. Also, what is making it go back to walking around randomly after it hits the wall? – CBredlow Aug 5 '13 at 16:40
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your counter = counter + 1 is wrong. When your isInScreen returns False, the while loop breaks and the code ends, since, the counter is being incremented but you don't loop over again. See the following code -

import turtle
import random

def isInScreen(w,t):
    leftBound = w.window_width() / -2.0
    rightBound = w.window_width() / 2.0
    bottomBound = w.window_height() / -2.0
    topBound = w.window_height() / 2.0

    turtlex = t.xcor()
    turtley = t.ycor()

    if turtlex < leftBound or turtlex > rightBound or turtley < bottomBound or turtley > topBound:
        return False

    return True

def randomWalk(t,w):
    counter = 0

    while True:
        while isInScreen(w,t):
            coin = random.randrange(0,2)
            if coin == 0:
                t.left(90)
            else:
                t.right(90)
            t.forward(50)
        t.left(180)
        t.forward(50)
        counter += 1
        if counter == 4:
            break

wn = turtle.Screen()
wn.bgcolor('lightcyan')

steklovata = turtle.Turtle()
steklovata.color('darkslategray')
steklovata.shape('turtle')

randomWalk(steklovata,wn)

wn.exitonclick()

P.S - You don't need a variable to store stillIn, if the if condition evaluates to True, just return False, and if it doesn't return True. (Changes reflected in the above code).

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That worked perfectly, thanks a lot! I didn't know about break, I'm gonna read about it so I can use it in the future. – reggaelizard Aug 5 '13 at 16:47
    
Couldn't the while still be while counter < 4? I don't quite get how that couldn't work, then again I'm not that great at python yet. – CBredlow Aug 5 '13 at 16:55
1  
There's nothing wrong with the approach. In fact I think the nested loops better model how we might think of your application from a behavioral perspective. i.e. "Keep moving randomly so long as we're in the screen. Once we leave it, turn around, then resume randomly walking." As a good habit, though, I tend to avoid while True: loops and nested loops unless really necessary. – Brian Aug 5 '13 at 17:05
1  
@Brian : I do too. But, in this case I thought it was better to use a while True: since it was more clearer and the OP could instantly relate to it and find out his problem. :) – Sukrit Kalra Aug 5 '13 at 17:07
1  
@SukritKalra I agree, it more clearly communicates what the problem was originally, which is why I'm glad he now has both approaches to see. +1 – Brian Aug 5 '13 at 17:08

As an alternative to the nested loops and to avoid some redundant statements, the following should produce the same result as Sukrit's answer.

def randomWalk(t,w):
    counter = 0

    while counter < 4:
        if not isInScreen(w,t):
            t.left(180)
            counter += 1
        else:
            coin = random.randrange(0,2)
            if coin == 0:
                t.left(90)
            else:
                t.right(90)
        t.forward(50)

The core issue is making sure that isInScreen returning false does not cause your while loop to terminate while also incrementing counter within the loop body.

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Your big while loop there is the cause of failure and you know that. So what you can do is make the while loop just check the counter only and not do the isInScreen() as part of the while loop. Now for checking if you can go forward, you can cheat by looking before you leap, that is add the value of fifty to your current position and check to see if you will be in screen, if not go forward, otherwise go as close as you can, increment the collision counter, and then turn around. Alternatively, Sukrit Kalra's answer might be easier to implement.

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