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i am new to this site and i am a beginner in java. i am making a program and it takes in 5 numbers and spits them out. why doesnt this code work? this is the first .java of 2. i put marks where i think the problem is at.

public class digitExtractor {
    int tNumber;
    String sNumber;

    // OP thinks the problem is here...
    public digitExtractor(int tNumber) {       


    }
    // ... and here
    public digitExtractor(String sNumber) {



    }

    public void returnInvertedOrderByMath() {
        int Integer1;
        int Integer2;
        int Integer3;
        int Integer4;
        int Integer5;
        Integer1 = (tNumber % 10);
        Integer2 = (tNumber % 100) / 10;
        Integer3 = (tNumber % 1000) / 100;
        Integer4 = (tNumber % 10000) / 1000;
        Integer5 = (tNumber % 100000) /10000;

        System.out.println(Integer1 + "\n" + Integer2 + "\n" + Integer3 + "\n" + Integer4 + "\n" + Integer5);
    }

    public void returnInvertedOrderByString() {
        char part1;
        char part2;
        char part3;
        char part4;
        char part5;
        part1 = sNumber.charAt(4);
        part2 = sNumber.charAt(3);
        part3 = sNumber.charAt(2);
        part4 = sNumber.charAt(1);
        part5 = sNumber.charAt(0);
        System.out.println(part1 + "\n" + part2 + "\n" + part3 + "\n" + part4 + "\n" + part5);

    }
}
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2  
Can you elaborate on "doesnt work"? Does it compile? Are there any errors? What do the errors say? –  jbabey Aug 5 '13 at 17:10
    
For starters, there is no mention of any symptoms. –  Hot Licks Aug 5 '13 at 17:10
1  
Welcome to SO. Please read the FAQ and How to Ask for tips on writing good questions. From your description it is very hard to tell what you are trying to accomplish. If you are asking for someone to fill in the missing code in the digitExtractor(...) constructors (which should be DigitExtractor to follow conventions), this is the wrong place. You need to make an effort to solve your own problem, not just post some code and expect others to finish it for you. –  Jim Garrison Aug 5 '13 at 17:10

3 Answers 3

I think what you want is to initialize instance fields in your constructors.

In public digitExtractor(int tNumber), you would have a body as such:

// assigning instance field with constructor's argument value
this.nNumber = tNumber; 

In public digitExtractor(String sNumber), you would have a body as such:

// assigning instance field with constructor's argument value
this.sNumber = sNumber; 

This way, your returnInvertedOrder will reference fields of DigitExtractor that have been initialized, and then do the operations you want to perform.

Note that this is especially important for the String field, as you would throw a NullPointerException if it hasn't been initialized before referencing it in your code.

The int will default to 0 if not initialized.

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This should work keep in mind that i added a main method to your programm to test your code and look at the comments that i added to your code.

public class DigitExtractor {
    private int tNumber;
    private String sNumber;

    public static void main(String[] args){

        //this will work because i chose the right constructor
        DigitExtractor d = new DigitExtractor(10000);
        d.returnInvertedOrderByMath();

        //this wont work because sNumber is null
        //d.returnInvertedOrderByString
    }

    public DigitExtractor(int tNumber) {
        this.tNumber = tNumber;
    }
    public DigitExtractor(String sNumber) {
        this.sNumber = sNumber;
    }

    public void returnInvertedOrderByMath() {
        int Integer1 = (tNumber % 10);
        int Integer2 = (tNumber % 100) / 10;
        int Integer3 = (tNumber % 1000) / 100;
        int Integer4 = (tNumber % 10000) / 1000;
        int Integer5 = (tNumber % 100000) /10000;

        System.out.println(Integer1 + "\n" + Integer2 + "\n" + Integer3 + "\n" + Integer4 + "\n" + Integer5);
    }

    public void returnInvertedOrderByString() {
        char part1 = sNumber.charAt(4);
        char part2 = sNumber.charAt(3);
        char part3 = sNumber.charAt(2);
        char part4 = sNumber.charAt(1);
        char part5 = sNumber.charAt(0);

        System.out.println(part1 + "\n" + part2 + "\n" + part3 + "\n" + part4 + "\n" + part5);

    }
}
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int tNumber; // This is an instance variable as it belongs to the class
String sNumber;

// This is a constructor which takes an integer
public digitExtractor(int tNumber) {  // tNumber here is a parameter which is not the same as tNumber above. You can change the name of this parameter to anything you like     
    // "this" keyword tells us we are referring to instance variable and assigning the value of tNumber parameter to instance one
    this.tNumber = tNumber; 
}

public digitExtractor(String sNumber) {
    if (sNumber == null){
        this.sNumber = ""; // if null, let's put an empty string as default
    } else {
        this.sNumber = sNumber;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your code in digitExtractor(String) will not assign this.sNumber if sNumber is null. I have submitted an edit suggestion to fix it. –  Jason C Aug 5 '13 at 18:14
    
@JasonC forgot the this! That's when an IDE is to the rescue. Thanks. –  Sajal Dutta Aug 5 '13 at 18:19

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