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I have a class with two overrides for == operator, to compare it to other instances of this class, and to compare to instance of string.

class SomeClass
{
    string value;
    public SomeClass (string _Value)
    {
        value = _Value;
    }

    static public bool operator == (SomeClass C1, SomeClass C2)
    {
        return C1.value == C2.value;
    }

    static public bool operator != (SomeClass C1, SomeClass C2)
    {
        return C1.value != C2.value;
    }

    static public bool operator == (SomeClass C1, string C2)
    {
        return C1.value == (string) C2;
    }

    static public bool operator != (SomeClass C1, string C2)
    {
        return C1.value != (string) C2;
    }
}

However, when I try to compare this class to null:

        Console.WriteLine(someObject == null);

I get the following error:

Error CS0121: The call is ambiguous between the following methods or properties: `SomeClass.operator ==(SomeClass, SomeClass)' and `SomeClass.operator ==(SomeClass, string)'

How should I define my == overrides so I can still null-check instances of this class?

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1  
Perhaps there's something clever you can do with a null coalesce –  tnw Aug 5 '13 at 17:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since you're using a null literal, the compiler doesn't know which method to call since both string and SomeClass can be null.

One technique to force the compiler to choose one of the methods is to typecast the null.

Console.WriteLine(someObject == ((SomeClass)null));

Or better yet, instead of using null explicitly, use the default keyword to get the null value (because default(T) is null when T is a reference type).

Console.WriteLine(someObject == default(SomeClass));
share|improve this answer
    
That proved to be the most elegant way, thanks. Although (SomeClass)null can look strange in the code (I would certainly be surprised by that until today), I think that it's still quite good for readability: if the maintainer decides to explore it, he'll just have to remove it to see the error, and he'll (supposedly) will easily understand the purpose of this "spell". –  Max Yankov Aug 5 '13 at 19:53
    
@golergka Now, with the actual implementations you showed in the question, your overloads of == could both explode with a NullReferenceException. Maybe you wanted the C# built-in overload operator ==(object, object) (not actually a method in the IL)? I think you did. So that is someObject == (object)null or (object)someObject == null or (object)someObject == (object)null (all three go to the built-in ==, not any of your operators). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 27 '14 at 23:24

Rather than defining two equality operators, you could create an implicit conversion between string and SomeClass:

class SomeClass
{
    string value;
    public SomeClass(string _Value)
    {
        value = _Value;
    }
    static public bool operator ==(SomeClass C1, SomeClass C2)
    {
        return C1.value == C2.value;
    }
    static public bool operator !=(SomeClass C1, SomeClass C2)
    {
        return C1.value != C2.value;
    }

    public static implicit operator string(SomeClass instance)
    {
        return instance.value;
    }

    public static implicit operator SomeClass(string str)
    {
        return new SomeClass(str);
    }
    //TODO override Equals and GetHashCode to use `value`
}

Now when you compare the value with null there is no ambiguity issue.

This also has the side effect of making the classes implicitly convertible to each other everywhere else, but based on the context that doesn't seem to be a bad thing.

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That's a good idea. However, in this particular case the goal of the class (obviously, not the one presented in the question) was to replace string class so it would provide similar functionality with additional contract, and to make sure that strings are not used in a certain context — so implicit conversions would defeat it's purpose. However, in general, that's a great solution, thanks. –  Max Yankov Aug 5 '13 at 18:03
    
Saying someObject == null is no longer ambiguous (and does not go through the implicit operator), but of course the implementation of the operator == leads to a sure NullReferenceException because C2 will be null. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Jan 27 '14 at 23:35

You can pass 2nd param as "object" and check its type before deciding which equality to do.

static public bool operator == (SomeClass C1, object C2)
{
  if(C2 is SomeClass)
    return C1.value == ((SomeClass)C2).value;
  else if (C2 is string)
    return C1.value == (string) C2;
}
share|improve this answer
    
But then you could also pass in a bool, and that shouldn't even compile. –  Servy Aug 5 '13 at 17:56
    
code is obviously partial as it needs another check to handle unsupported types, which i don't know how OP wants to handle –  kostyan Aug 5 '13 at 18:21
    
Reglardless, it would only be a runtime check, not a compile time check. It should be a compile time check. –  Servy Aug 5 '13 at 18:23

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