Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In Git, file contents are stored in blob objects. Tree objects represent a directory. They list the files in the directory, and the blob in which the file contents are stored. They also list subdirectories, and the tree that represents the subdirectory. In this sense, a tree in Git is a recursive data structure: it can contain references to itself.

The alternative would be a non-recursive data structure, where a single tree object would list all tracked files in the repository, and store not only the filename, but the full path relative to the root of the repository.

I admire the elegant way in which Git treats data, so I am convinced there must be a good reason why Git uses the recursive form. I came up with several reasons, all of which I discarded:

  • A tree per subdirectory would allow tracking directories. It could enable tracking empty directories. Storing directory metadata is more elegant in recursive form (the non-recursive tree would require two types of entry to track subdirectories).

    However, Git does not track empty directories, nor does it store directory metadata.

  • Recursive trees allow unchanged subdirectories to share the same tree among commits. This would be more space efficient in a repository with many files, where only a few files change per commit, especially when many subdirectories are used.

    However, space efficiency is not a concern in tree objects: packfiles take care of compression, and the non-recursive trees might even be better compressible because they contain less hashes (which are essentially random). Additionally, the data-to-files ratio will generally be large, so the size of the tree objects has little impact on the repository size.

  • Recursive trees might allow for more elegant algorithms. Operations on the repository can be handled recursively.

    However, (perhaps recursively) building a list of all files in the repository, and then operating on the flat list, is in many cases even easier.

  • Recursive trees could allow for easier detection of directory renames.

    However, Git uses heuristics to detect renames anyway, so this is of little use.

I am unsure about the differences in performance. It is not obvious to me that one of the two representations would be faster.

My question is: why is the recursive form used? Is there a specific advantage to using the this form?

share|improve this question
2  
"Recursive trees allow unchanged subdirectories to share the same tree among commits. This would be more space efficient in a repository with many files, where only a few files change per commit, especially when many subdirectories are used." --- i think you hit the nail on the head in your question. – xero Aug 5 '13 at 18:27
    
you seem to be assuming that non-recursive is the default, and there's needs to be a reason for recursive. in my experience, if you're storing trees, you automatically choose a recursive structure, because it tends to work better for all the reasons you list. so even if there's no obvious single explanation, that's the "normal" way to do it. – andrew cooke Aug 5 '13 at 19:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.