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In the following foreach p : allPersons, it's clear (since the logic is sequential) that the map/Dictionary can be used for caching/memoization.

Dictionary<string, int> personNameToIdMap = new Dictionary<string, int>();

foreach(p : allPersons)
{

 int outputId;

 if(personNameToIdMap.TryGetValue(p.Name, out outputId))
 {
   // nothing to do since map contained the p.Name
 }
 else
 { 
    outputId = doExpensiveLookup(p.Name);
    personNameToIdMap[p.Name] = outputId;
 }

  ...

  p.Id = outputId;

}

If I replace the above foreach with Parallel.ForEach, will each thread share personNameToIdMap?

share|improve this question
    
Note that the foreach syntax you showed isn't C# ;) Interesting mix of C# and C++11 syntax here... –  Reed Copsey Aug 5 '13 at 18:15
    
Reed - I recently worked in Java for a fair amount of time, so my C# syntax is not 100% - ha –  Kevin Meredith Aug 5 '13 at 18:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, in case of Parallel.Foreach each thread will be using same instance of Dictionary.

If you really want parallelism you can use ConcurrentDictionary which is thread safe version of Dictionary

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1  
+1 ConcurrentDictionary is definitely the way to go, but the logic would likely be best if changed slightly. –  Reed Copsey Aug 5 '13 at 18:19
1  
+1. With a Concurrent Dictionary, do you expect there to be much contention in a Parallel.ForEach where the threads end up fighting over one another? –  Moo-Juice Aug 5 '13 at 18:21
    
@Moo-Juice obviously there will be a slight overhead because of multiple threads, that's why I wrote if you really want parallelism :) –  Haris Hasan Aug 5 '13 at 18:23
1  
@Moo-Juice in this case, the contention should be very low, as reads are very cheap, there are few writes/adds (in this code), and CD does very fine-grained locking. –  Reed Copsey Aug 5 '13 at 18:24
1  
@Kevin It's worse than that - Dictionary<T,U> is not thread safe, so you get undefined behavior if you're using it from multiple threads without locking/synchronization. Basically, you really can't know what you'll get - it may be the right answer, multiple threads may both try to write to each other, you may get a crash trying to access some internal structure before it's setup, etc... –  Reed Copsey Aug 5 '13 at 19:10

Harris is completely correct - ConcurrentDictionary<T,U> would be the proper approach. Given that, you'll likely want to change your method slightly to take advantage of ConcurrentDictionary's GetOrAdd method:

ConcurrentDictionary<string, int> personNameToIdMap = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, int>();

Parallel.ForEach(allPersons, p =>
{
    int outputId = personNameToIdMap.GetOrAdd(p.Name, name => doExpensiveLookup(p.Name));

    // ...
    p.Id = outputId;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is it necessary to make sure that allPersons is thread-safe? Currently it's a List<Person>, but I read on C# List documentation that List is not thread-safe –  Kevin Meredith Aug 6 '13 at 14:25
1  
@Kevin No - IEnumerable<T> is inherently not thread safe - As such, Parallel will take care of that part for you. Using a List<T> is fine there. –  Reed Copsey Aug 6 '13 at 15:31

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