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I made the discovery and tested it with my application. I'm calling and invoking the same method.

I tried different consecutive executions and also different methods (encryption, sorting, etc...) and got the following results.

Executions|Invoke-Call ratio

1         | 62,78%

10        | 107,58%

100       | 76,74%

1000      | 80,01%

10000     | 116,88%

100000    | 82,80%

1000000   | 91,67%

I checked if it might be the use of multiple threads but it's not from what I can tell. What could be the explanation?

For further clarification an excerpt of my benchmark: The invoke part:

Executable executable = new Executable();
Method execute = executable.getClass().getMethod("execute");
System.out.println("# Startup finished.");
for (float i = 0; i <= 6; i++)
{
    int executions = (int) Math.pow(10, i);
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int j = 0; j <= executions - 1; j++)
    {
        execute.invoke(executable);
    }
    long stop = System.nanoTime();
    long delta = stop - start;
    System.out.println("Invoke;" + executions + ";" + delta);
}
System.out.println("# Shutdown finished.");

The call part:

Executable executable = new Executable();
System.out.println("# Startup finished.");
for (float i = 0; i <= 6; i++)
{
    int executions = (int) Math.pow(10, i);
    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int j = 0; j <= executions - 1; j++)
    {
        executable.execute();
    }
    long stop = System.nanoTime();
    long delta = stop - start;
    System.out.println("Invoke;" + executions + ";" + delta);
}
System.out.println("# Shutdown finished.");

For this example of Executable class I have taken extra caution to exclude all preparation work from the execute method.

public class Executable
{
    private int index = 0;
    private int testsize = 1111111;
    private byte[][] plain = new byte[testsize][];
    private byte[][] hashed = new byte[testsize][];
    private SecureRandom securerandom;
    private MessageDigest messagedigest;

    public Executable()
    {
        this.securerandom = new SecureRandom();
        this.messagedigest = MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-256");
        for (int i = 0; i <= testsize - 1; i++)
        {
            this.plain[i] = new byte[8];
            this.securerandom.nextBytes(this.plain[i]);
        }
    }

    public void execute()
    {
        messagedigest.update(this.plain[index]);
        this.hashed[index] = messagedigest.digest();
        index++;
    }
}
share|improve this question
6  
You probably measured wrong (eg, JIT delays). Show us your benchmark. –  SLaks Aug 5 '13 at 18:21
7  
See stackoverflow.com/q/504103/34397 –  SLaks Aug 5 '13 at 18:21
    
The normal invocation is normally much faster, you should show your code. –  Jacob Raihle Aug 5 '13 at 18:29
    
Thank you for your comments, I have extracted the benchmark from my application. –  John Frost Aug 5 '13 at 19:50
    
What does the Executable.execute() method look like? –  StriplingWarrior Aug 5 '13 at 19:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just for sake of interested persons the code works as expected and the call is faster than invoke.

# Startup finished.
Invoke  1   1683969
Invoke  10  1876447
Invoke  100 23376245
Invoke  1000    29035955
Invoke  10000   55816067
Invoke  100000  209290359
# Shutdown finished.
# Startup finished.
Call    1   64587
Call    10  18820
Call    100 209160
Call    1000    1656594
Call    10000   17318746
Call    100000  167565824
# Shutdown finished.
share|improve this answer
    
OK, I found out as people suggested before in their links, you have to execute invokes and calls in two separate programs or it will totally screw the results. I'm getting the expected results now. Thank you very much. –  John Frost Aug 6 '13 at 4:58

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