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How can I generate serial lists by combining any two elements from a longer list, say with 4 elements?

For example, I want to get '(1 2), '(1 3), '(1 4), '(2 3), '(2 4), and '(3 4) based on '(1 2 3 4).

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3 Answers 3

The question asks for the 2-sized list of combinations of a given list. It can be implemented in terms of a more general procedure that produces n-sized combinations:

(define (combinations size elements)
  (cond [(zero? size)
         '(())]
        [(empty? elements)
         empty]
        [else
         (append (map (curry cons (first elements))
                      (combinations (sub1 size) (rest elements)))
                 (combinations size (rest elements)))]))

It works as expected when we specify that size=2:

(combinations 2 '(1 2 3 4))
=> '((1 2) (1 3) (1 4) (2 3) (2 4) (3 4))
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This is a really nice answer, but I was surprised to not find it in racket, given its presence in both Python (itertools) and Clojure (math.combinatorics) –  Peter Aug 5 '13 at 21:59
    
Agreed. There should exist a standard combinatorics module for Racket, using streams –  Óscar López Aug 5 '13 at 23:10
    
Are you thinking what I'm thinking? ;-) –  Peter Aug 6 '13 at 2:24
2  
I wish I had the spare time :) –  Óscar López Aug 6 '13 at 2:25

Here is a solution just as you specified (one function, one argument). For input like '(next rest ...) the solution computes a result for next and then recurses on rest ... - using append to combine the two parts.

(define (combine elts)
  (if (null? elts)
      '()
       (let ((next (car elts))
             (rest (cdr elts)))
         (append (map (lambda (other) (list next other)) rest)
                 (combine rest)))))
> (combine '(1 2 3 4))
((1 2) (1 3) (1 4) (2 3) (2 4) (3 4))
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I think you want all the permutations as per this answer.

Using his permutations function definition, you could do something like:

(permutations 2 '(1 2 3 4))
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In this case the solution requires the combinations, not the permutations of the input list. The exact opposite of the situation described in the linked answer –  Óscar López Aug 5 '13 at 21:50
    
Right you are. I always get those backward. Let's see if I can fix the example... Or you're welcome to as well :-) –  Peter Aug 5 '13 at 21:53
    
I already fixed it, in my answer ;) –  Óscar López Aug 5 '13 at 21:55
    
Very nice. I think it will take me longer to understand it than it took you to fix. –  Peter Aug 5 '13 at 21:55

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