Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

When 'val' below is not a bool I get an exception, I believe I can use TryParse but I'm not sure how best to use it with my code below. Can anyone help?

checkBox.Checked = Convert.ToBoolean(val);

Thanks

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

The code is as follows to determine whether the string val is a valid Boolean value and use it to set the Checked property if so. You need to decide what action you would take if it does not represent a valid value.

bool result;
if (bool.TryParse(val, out result))
{
    // val does represent a Boolean
    checkBox.Checked = result;
}
else
{
    // val does not represent a Boolean
}
share|improve this answer

Assuming that if its not a valid boolean, you don't want it checked:

bool result = false;
bool.TryParse(val, out result);
checkBox.Checked = result;
share|improve this answer
    
and if TryParse() failed? –  Joel Coehoorn Oct 7 '08 at 23:05
2  
Joel - if TryParse failed checkBox.Checked would default to false. –  Erik Forbes Oct 8 '08 at 16:30
bool z = false;
if(Boolean.TryParse(val, out z))
{
  checkBox.Checked = z;
}

Just a note: Parse and convert are different operations and may lead to different results.

share|improve this answer

Well it depends; if you want checkBox.Checked to be equal to true if val - if it is a string - parses to true then use the following:-

bool output;
checkBox.Checked = bool.TryParse(val, out output) && output;

If bool is not a string then you need to decide how to deal with it depending on its type, e.g.:-

checkBox.Checked = val != 0;

etc.

share|improve this answer

Good answers here already.

I will however add, do be careful with TryParse, because contrary to what its name indicates, it can infact still throw an ArgumentException!

That's one of my pet annoyances with .NET! :)

share|improve this answer

FWIW, the following may also come in handy in this (or similar) cases...

bool myBool = val ?? false;

...which is the good old "null-coalescing operator" and quite nice.

Read more about it here if you are interested: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173224.aspx

share|improve this answer

bool isBool = false;

bool.TryParse( val, ref isBool );

if( isBool )    
{
   ///ok;

}
else
{
  // fail;
}
share|improve this answer

Just posted this same snippet for another question, but here is the code I use across projects for doing a much better job of handling booleans in all their assorted versions:

bool shouldCheck;
TryParseBool(val, out shouldCheck);
checkBox.Checked = shouldCheck;

/// <summary>
/// Legal values: Case insensitive strings TRUE/FALSE, T/F, YES/NO, Y/N, numbers (0 => false, non-zero => true)
/// Similar to "bool.TryParse(string text, out bool)" except that it handles values other than 'true'/'false'
/// </summary>
public static bool TryParseBool(object inVal, out bool retVal)
{
    // There are a couple of built-in ways to convert values to boolean, but unfortunately they skip things like YES/NO, 1/0, T/F
    //bool.TryParse(string, out bool retVal) (.NET 4.0 Only); Convert.ToBoolean(object) (requires try/catch)
    inVal = (inVal ?? "").ToString().Trim().ToUpper();
    switch ((string)inVal)
    {
        case "TRUE":
        case "T":
        case "YES":
        case "Y":
            retVal = true;
            return true;
        case "FALSE":
        case "F":
        case "NO":
        case "N":
            retVal = false;
            return true;
        default:
            // If value can be parsed as a number, 0==false, non-zero==true (old C/C++ usage)
            double number;
            if (double.TryParse((string)inVal, out number))
            {
                retVal = (number != 0);
                return true;
            }
            // If not a valid value for conversion, return false (not parsed)
            retVal = false;
            return false;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
1) This doesn't answer the question that is asked here. 2) If you find yourself posting the same answer to lots of different questions you're doing something wrong. Either the questions really are different and the answer doesn't apply to all of them (which is the case here), or the questions are duplicates and should just have all but one closed as a duplicate of the best one. –  Servy Apr 3 '13 at 16:43
    
I think that this is a valid reply to the question. They asked why TryParse didn't work, I gave a routine that would do what they wanted. Perhaps I should have added the usage: bool shouldCheck; TryParseBool(val, out shouldCheck); checkBox.Checked = shouldCheck; –  Mick Bruno Apr 3 '13 at 21:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.