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I trying to make next with closure:

function func(number) {
    var result = number;

    var res = function(num) {
        return result + num;
    };
    return res;
}

var result = func(2)(3)(4)(5)(3);
console.log(result); // 17

I need to receive 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 3 = 17 But I got an error: Uncaught TypeError: number is not a function

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9  
This hurts my brain.. You can either return a function or a number, not both.. –  Mike Christensen Aug 5 '13 at 19:40
    
@MikeChristensen: Actually, you could return both by checking arguments.length. –  SLaks Aug 5 '13 at 19:43
3  
@SLaks - Oh and put a () at the end of the chain? Yea, that'd be a clever way to annoy your co-workers. –  Mike Christensen Aug 5 '13 at 19:44
2  
Is there any reason why you can't use func(2, 3, 4, 5, 3) and rework your function to accommodate that setup? Although you have a simple example, it kinda makes more sense to head this way instead of continually invoking a function?... –  Ian Aug 5 '13 at 19:48
1  
possible duplicate of Javascript sum function –  Paulo Almeida Aug 5 '13 at 20:17

7 Answers 7

You're misusing your functions.

func(2) returns the res function.
Calling that function with (3) returns the number 5 (via return result + num).

5 is not a function, so (4) gives an error.

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I understand, but help me plz to make correct. –  Shkarbatov Dmitriy Aug 5 '13 at 19:44
    
@user2056866 It's hard to see what practical use this would have so it's likely that this is homework. Are you trying to make a recursive function? You're a bit off if so. –  Juhana Aug 5 '13 at 19:46
    
Just for interesting, I trying to do this throught closure. –  Shkarbatov Dmitriy Aug 5 '13 at 19:49
    
@user2056866: Read on currying. –  Bergi Aug 5 '13 at 20:06
    
@user2056866: Try my answer. its not exactly how you want it but its almost the same. –  Amogh Talpallikar Aug 5 '13 at 20:18

You somehow have to signalize the end of the chain, where you are going to return the result number instead of another function. You have the choice:

  • make it return a function for a fixed number of times - this is the only way to use the syntax like you have it, but it's boring. Look at @PaulS' answer for that. You might make the first invocation (func(n)) provide the number for how many arguments sum is curried.
  • return the result under certain circumstances, like when the function is called with no arguments (@PaulS' second implementation) or with a special value (null in @AmoghTalpallikar's answer).
  • create a method on the function object that returns the value. valueOf() is suited well because it will be invoked when the function is casted to a primitive value. See it in action:

    function func(x) {
        function ret(y) {
            return func(x+y);
        }
        ret.valueOf = function() {
            return x;
        };
        return ret;
    }
    
    func(2) // Function
    func(2).valueOf() // 2
    func(2)(3) // Function
    func(2)(3).valueOf() // 5
    func(2)(3)(4)(5)(3) // Function
    func(2)(3)(4)(5)(3)+0 // 17
    
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in my version though. if I call. f(4)(5) result becomes 9. nxt time f(1)(3)(null) will give 13 instead 4! :( –  Amogh Talpallikar Aug 5 '13 at 20:29
    
+0 for the number +1 for a nice hack ;) –  metadings Aug 5 '13 at 20:37
    
This is awesome!!! –  Amogh Talpallikar Aug 6 '13 at 5:09

Well, the (2)(3) part is correct. Calling func(2) is going to return you res, which is a function. But then, calling (3) is going to return you the result of res, which is a number. So the problem comes when you try to call (4).

For what you're trying to do, I don't see how Javascript would predict that you're at the end of the chain, and decide to return a number instead of a function. Maybe you could somehow return a function that has a "result" property using object properties, but mostly I'm just curious about why you're trying to do things this way. Obviously, for your specific example, the easiest way would just be adding the numbers together, but I'm guessing you're going a bit further with something.

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Yes, it is just for interesting. But I still can`t understand how will be right. –  Shkarbatov Dmitriy Aug 5 '13 at 19:47
    
Like I said, your entire method of calling it this way is weird. Would it be more acceptable to return an object with chain-callable functions? ie, func().addmore(3).addmore(5).addmore(7).getResult() ? This is normally what JQuery does. –  Katana314 Aug 5 '13 at 20:11

If you want to keep invoking it, you need to keep returning a function until you want your answer. e.g. for 5 invocations

function func(number) {
    var result = number,
        iteration = 0,
        fn = function (num) {
            result += num;
            if (++iteration < 4) return fn;
            return result;
        };
    return fn;
}
func(2)(3)(4)(5)(3); // 17

You could also do something for more lengths that works like this

function func(number) {
    var result = number,
        fn = function () {
            var i;
            for (i = 0; i < arguments.length; ++i)
                result += arguments[i];
            if (i !== 0) return fn;
            return result;
        };
    return fn;
}
func(2)(3, 4, 5)(3)(); // 17
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@downvoter, please explain –  Paul S. Aug 5 '13 at 19:46
3  
I havent downvoted your answer but it works only for exactly these many numbers of (). Its not dynamic. –  Amogh Talpallikar Aug 5 '13 at 19:52
1  
@AmoghTalpallikar well I wrote it for OPs example, edited in one that works a little differently –  Paul S. Aug 5 '13 at 19:59

I flagged this as a duplicate, but since this alternative is also missing from that question I'll add it here. If I understand correctly why you would think this is interesting (having an arbitrary function that is applied sequentially to a list of values, accumulating the result), you should also look into reduce:

function sum(a, b) {
    return a + b;
}

a = [2, 3, 4, 5, 3];

b = a.reduce(sum);
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This is the nearest I have reached to how you want your function to be using JavaScript Closures. However, my version needs to be terminated by a null as the parameter of last call.

function AdderCreator()
{
  var result = 0;
  function adder(n)
   {
      if(n!=null)
      {
       result = result + n;
       return adder;
      }else {temp = result;result = 0; return temp};
   }

  return adder;
}

f = AdderCreator()

f(2)(3)(4)(5)(3)(null) // 17

UPDATE This one has an issue.

if you just call f(5)(3)(3) without an null. result becomes 5 + 3 + 3 = 11.

next time even if you call the method the correct way, f(5)(2)(null), instead of returning 7, it will give 18.

So Here is a better approach:

function AdderCreator()
{
  var result = 0;
  function adder(n)
   { 
      if(n!="end")
      {
       if(n == "begin") result = 0;
       else result = result + n;
       return adder;
      }else {temp = result;result = 0; return temp};
   }

  return adder;
}

f = AdderCreator()

f("begin")(4)(2)(1)(9)("end") // 16

will always work!

you can replace "begin" and "end" with string or values you want!

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One man can help me:

var foo = (function() {
    var sum = 0;

    function bar() {
        sum += arguments[ 0 ] || 0;
        return bar;
    }

    bar.toString = function() {
        return sum;
    };

    return bar;
}());


alert( foo(2)(3)(4)(5)(3) );
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