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This is copied from The C Programming Language By Ritchie. I've tried to make some modifications but it always gets stuck on the for loop (line 7)

#include <stdio.h>

main()
{

    int fahr;

    for(fahr = 0; fahr <= 300; fahr = fahr + 20)
    {
        printf("%3d %6.1f\n", fahr, (5.0/9.0)*(fahr-32));

    }

}

error: ./farn.c: 8: ./farn.c: Syntax error: Bad for loop variable

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1  
Works fine for me: ideone.com/ucPtev Do you maybe have a stray character in your file somewhere? Try use hexdump or less to investigate. –  Hunter McMillen Aug 5 '13 at 19:56
2  
Works for me. How are you compiling it? –  Jim Aug 5 '13 at 19:58
1  
Are you sure you are editing the same file you are compiling? –  Jim Aug 5 '13 at 19:59
    
I'd be equally concerned about the ambiguous nature of your main() return, which is not in line with the standard. What compiler is this being built with anyway? (and I'm curious if you receive the same erro with fahr += 20 for your final expression stmt.) –  WhozCraig Aug 5 '13 at 20:01
1  
Please post the exact command you are using to compile this. And anything else you do before you get that message. –  Ziffusion Aug 5 '13 at 20:04

4 Answers 4

I reproduced your problem. On Ubuntu, /bin/sh is symbolically linked to dash.

$ dash ./farn.c
./farn.c: 8: Syntax error: Bad for loop variable

It is very rare for a C program to be correctly interpreted by a Bourne shell interpreter (or one of its derivatives).

Compile the program with a C compiler, and run the executable (alternatively, use a C language interpreter if you can find one). On Ubuntu, you can use gcc:

$ gcc -W -Wall -Werror -pedantic -std=c99 farn.c -o farn
$ ./farn

Since the K&R book predates C.99, the above compilation command will generate an error:

cc1: warnings being treated as errors
farn.c:4: warning: return type defaults to 'int'

To fix this, you can simply update the declaration of main() with an explicit int return type. In C.99, encountering the } at the end of main() implicitly returns 0, so adding int is sufficient.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{

    int fahr;

    for(fahr = 0; fahr <= 300; fahr = fahr + 20)
    {
        printf("%3d %6.1f\n", fahr, (5.0/9.0)*(fahr-32));

    }

}
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After googling (in quotes) "Bad for loop variable", I had just reached the same conclusion - "this was being run through a shell, not a compiler". You beat me by about a minute... –  Floris Aug 5 '13 at 20:49
    
I would probably want to add - "compile the program with the following line: gcc farn.c -o farn, then run it with ./farn. –  Floris Aug 5 '13 at 20:50
    
@Floris: Thanks for the suggestion. –  jxh Aug 5 '13 at 21:02
    
Nice catch to reproduce using dash. –  chux Aug 6 '13 at 5:18

Other than the fact that you're defining main() in a very lazy way and the lack of a return statement, I don't see anything wrong at all with the code above. After fixing those 2 issues, it compiled and ran just fine with the following options:

gcc temperature.c -g -Wall -Werror -pedantic -o temperature

As an aside, the entry-point to main should be either of:

int main(void) // You *can* leave void out here, but it's best to be explicit
int main(int argc, char* argv[]) // 2nd arg could also be char** argv

And you should always return an integer value from main, usually a return of 0 indicates the program ran successfully.

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He was following the K & R book exactly, I am sure. –  Jim Aug 5 '13 at 20:12
    
I'm sure he is, it seems to be a problem with his environment rather than his code. –  WhoBuntu Aug 5 '13 at 20:21

Your code compiles correctly. This is the proof : http://codepad.org/hryZ2dEm

I have also added the return type and the return instruction in the main function to make your code conform to the standard. Try to use the small changes I have inserted.

Let me know if you still have a problem.

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Thank for the advice everyone. I solved my problem by using GCC like a boss.

gcc farn.c -o farn

then

./farn 

works great. :-)

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