Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The suggested dispose pattern from Microsoft says that Dispose() and finalizer should both call a virtual third method Dispose(bool). So it looks something like this:

public class DisposeBase : IDisposable
{
    private bool _Disposed = false;

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    ~DisposeBase()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!_Disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                /* Get rid of managed resources */
            }

            /* Get rid of unmanaged resources */

            _Disposed = true;
        }
    }
}

Derived classes would override Dispose(bool). I thought about restructuring it a bit like this:

public abstract class ExtendableResourceHandlerBase : IDisposable
{
    private bool _Disposed = false;

    /* private resources managed and unmanaged */

    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    ~DisposeBase()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    private void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (!_Disposed)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                ManagedDispose();

                // Dispose of own managed resources
            }

            UnmanagedDispose();

            // Dispose of own unmanged resources

            _Disposed = true;
        }
    }

    protected abstract void ManagedDispose();

    protected abstract void UnmanagedDispose();

    protected abstract xxx ExtendMe(....)

    // other member functionality
}

I am thinking of scenario where in a framework you are declaring an abstract base class that provides an interface and some implementation aquiring resources that need to be disposed - hence the IDisposable interface. Now clients extending this base class would be forced to think about the disposal of their managed and unmanaged resources as well. In the case of the suggested pattern from microsoft one might forget about it. Please think of the name ExtendableResourceHandlerBase as just a place holder.

In my opinion this would make it easier for clients deriving from DisposeBase to implement their dispose methods. And as answers of another question show, other people think so too. The only reason I can think of why the good folks at microsoft build their pattern as it is now, is not to split up the disposal of managed and unmanaged resources. Are there any other reasons for it? Thanks alot for enlightening me.

share|improve this question
    
I wrote an answer about placing IDisposable implementation at the base of your hierarchy here stackoverflow.com/a/874782/14357 . –  spender Aug 5 '13 at 20:18
    
You need to describe benefits of your pattern. So far I see need to implement 2 functions and worry about chaining virtual 2 functions instead of 1... Not sure yet what balances it on positive side. –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 5 '13 at 20:34
1  
You only get one shot at inheritance, so this would be a no-no for me. Besides, I can't think of any real-world scenario where a derived class would be an "is-a DisposeBase". The whole purpose of the DisposeBase class is to dispose, so a derived class would be entirely about disposing itself in a different manner. –  Keith Payne Aug 5 '13 at 20:38
1  
Yep. I think Liskov wouldn't approve. –  spender Aug 5 '13 at 20:44
    
@KeithPayne - original sample is "pattern" (in sense of "we recommend you implementing IDispose in your classes this way") - it does not consume your base class - just suggestion how to structure it (if indeed you need to dispose objects in your hierarchy). It is unclear why OP's suggestion would be better pattern for that (as it is more complicated...) –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 5 '13 at 21:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When Microsoft documented and recommended the Dispose pattern, it was expected that classes which implemented IDisposable would often have one set of resources they would clean up in Dispose and a smaller set they clean up in Finalize; the pattern was designed around that expectation. In practice, the only classes which should ever override Finalize for any purpose other than to log failures to call Dispose are those which inherit directly from Object. If a derived class whose parent doesn't override Finalize would use an unmanaged resource that should be cleaned up in a finalizer, it shouldn't override Finalize itself nor hold the unmanaged resource directly, but instead encapsulate the resource in an instance of a class dedicated to that purpose. This will help avoid a lot of weird and tricky edge cases that can otherwise arise with finalization of objects which hold a mixture of managed and unmanaged resources.

Having the interface method which simply chains to a virtual method is a good idea, even if the protected void Dispose(bool) method will never get called with its parameter being anything other than true. The pattern might be a little cleaner if the protected virtual method were differentiated by name rather than by a useless parameter, but enough people expect the Microsoft pattern that one may as well use it even if it's not perfect.

share|improve this answer
    
+1. A great and ongoing source of confusion is the naming of the parameter - disposing. It would be so much clearer if MS had published the same pattern with the parameter named isNotBeingCalledFromTheFinalizer or something similar. But it is too late for that. –  Keith Payne Aug 6 '13 at 12:43
    
@KeithPayne Would changing that name be a breaking change? I can't think of a case in which it would be. –  Servy Aug 6 '13 at 14:00
    
@Servy Not at all. MS published the code sample on MSDN with disposing and it has been used as-is, in production code everywhere, ever since. It's like a regrettable tweet - once it hits the nets, you can never get rid of it! –  Keith Payne Aug 6 '13 at 14:16
    
@KeithPayne: If I could change some of that pattern code, I would. I would posit that if a class is going to have a Disposed flag, it should be tested and set via Interlocked method in the non-virtual Dispose handler. There's no other good way to have an overridable thread-safe Dispose method. Since an object will have to be created for every time Dispose is called (otherwise what would be being disposed?) the overhead of Interlocked shouldn't be an issue. –  supercat Aug 6 '13 at 14:59
    
@supercat - Thank you for your answer, but it is not quite what I was looking for. I edited the question to hopefully make it more understandable. Sorry about that. Is it okay not to accept the first answer as an answer? –  S. Larws Aug 6 '13 at 15:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.