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I'm wondering what the most correct way to do this in Scala is:

Id like to initialise a matrix like the following

0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3
0 1 2 3

Then id like to split it into 4 blocks :

0 1 | 2 3
0 1 | 2 3
---------
0 1 | 2 3
0 1 | 2 3

To end up with 4 matrices:

0 1   2 3   0 1   2 3
0 1   2 3   0 1   2 3

I can think of a few ways to do it with loops etc, but are there more functional ways to do it using scala's list methods?

Cheers NFV

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How are you representing your matrix? –  Mysterious Dan Aug 5 '13 at 21:51
    
Is the size of the original matrix fixed? Or will it vary, but always be a multiple of 2 along each axis? –  Richard Sitze Aug 5 '13 at 21:57
1  
Try working with Seq and it's method grouped(size:Int) and see what you can come up with.. come back with some code if you're having trouble, and see if we can help refine your approach. –  Richard Sitze Aug 5 '13 at 22:00
    
@MyseriousDan - Im new to scala so open to suggestions –  nfvindaloo Aug 6 '13 at 12:13
    
@RichardSitze The size can be assumed to be square and even –  nfvindaloo Aug 6 '13 at 12:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Define the matrix as a list of lists.

scala> val matrix = List(List(0,1,2,3),List(4,5,6,7), List(8,9,10,11),List(11,12,13,14))
matrix: List[List[Int]] = List(List(0, 1, 2, 3), List(4, 5, 6, 7), List(8, 9, 10, 11), List(11, 12, 13, 14))

Group the rows with grouped and match each group to extract the first half and the second half using take and takeRight

scala> matrix.grouped(2).flatMap(xs => xs match {
     | case x: List[List[Int]] => List(x.head.take(2) ::: x.last.take(2), List(x.head.takeRight(2) ::: x.last.takeRight(2)))
     | })
res0: Iterator[List[Any]] = non-empty iterator


scala> res0.toList
res1: List[List[Any]] = List(List(0, 1, 4, 5), List(List(2, 3, 6, 7)), List(8, 9, 11, 12), List(List(10, 11, 13, 14)))

This will work on square matrices and you'll have to do some more work for matrices of other sizes.

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Ill give that a go! –  nfvindaloo Aug 6 '13 at 12:14
    
Thanks for the solution Brian, using your code i came up with a way to apply it to a matrix of any size –  nfvindaloo Aug 6 '13 at 19:11

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