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I'm struggling to figure out how to import library projects into Android Studio in a fashion that makes them available to multiple projects. The documentation for the new build system implies that you need to import library projects into the root of the project you are working on:

Gradle projects can also depend on other gradle projects by using a multi-project setup. A multi-project setup usually works by having all the projects as sub folders of a given root project (http://tools.android.com/tech-docs/new-build-system/user-guide#TOC-Multi-project-setup)

This is problematic since, as I mentioned above, I would like to keep frequently-used libraries accessible to all current and future projects. For example, I am currently trying to integrate Volley into a new project to evaluate it, with the assumption that I will want to use it in multiple other projects in the future. I cloned it to my "${PROJECT_ROOT}/" folder, which is the same level at which I created my test project, giving me:

${PROJECT_ROOT}/TestProject/Test
${PROJECT_ROOT}/volley

After trying to set up my project's build.gradle file in a variety of ways, the only way that I've managed to make the app compile is to move Volley into the TestProject 'main' project, giving me:

${PROJECT_ROOT}/TestProject/Test
${PROJECT_ROOT}/TestProject/volley

Not only does this prevent me from using Volley in other projects that are not a part of TestProject without duplicating it or cloning it a second time, but it means that git wants me to add it to the repo I've established at the root of TestProject.

How can I reference library projects in my Android Studio projects without including them in the projects themselves?

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1 Answer 1

Couldn't you use git with submodules? e.g. In your .gitmodules file, you may add this:

[submodule "volley"]
path = volley
url = https://path/to/volley/repository 

You can set the url to Volley's official repository, or to your own in-house version of volley. Other projects can be setup the same way and point to the same volley repository.

I think this way, other users can call git clone and all the dependent projects will be downloaded within the main project folder and they don't have to worry about downloading the library projects separately.

For Volley though, I would just compile it into a JAR file and stick it into the /libs folder of the main project. That is, if you don't need to modify its source.

[Update] For library projects that you don't need to modify its source, you can try using Android Studio to compile them into AAR files for sharing. AAR file is like a JAR file to Android, so you can add them to your /lib source folder, or publish them to your local/intranet maven repository. If you choose the maven route, add your local/intranet repository in build.gradle, and reference the library project that you've published.

Hopefully in the future more Library projects owner will build their projects into AAR file and publish them to Maven Central Repository, so we can just reference them directly from the build.gradle file.

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I'll experiment with this and get back to you. Some projects such as ActionBarSherlock, however, can't be used as a JAR - especially if you need to point to any of its included styles, themes, etc. I know this isn't the greatest example as the new compatibility library now provides the same functionality, but I suspect there are other projects like that out there. –  Robert Peacock Aug 6 '13 at 7:22
1  
For library projects that you don't need to modify its source, you can try using Android Studio to compile them into AAR files first, then publish them to your local/intranet maven repository. Finally, add your local/intranet repository in build.gradle, and reference the library project that you've published. –  azgolfer Aug 6 '13 at 16:24
    
azgolfer, I've set up a maven repository and successfully managed to compile an app that depends on libraries contained therein. At first I thought this approach was overkill but it means that other developers on the team are saved from having to do any configuration whatsoever (though it might be overkill for a sole developer to run a maven repository locally). There are still issues of securing the repo for remote access, but none that can't be overcome. If you update your answer or post a new one to reflect using a maven repo I'll accept it. –  Robert Peacock Aug 19 '13 at 10:10
    
Hi @RobertPeacock Can you provide a little more info on how you set up the maven repo and add a library to it? I'm new to this and its all a little confusing. Thanks –  FMontano Oct 21 '14 at 22:23

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