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So, I'm trying to make a small library for android sqlite, and I've got most of the basic functions in, but what I'm having trouble with is returning results as a specific class. I've got

abstract public class Table<RowClass extends Row>{
    public List<RowClass> fetchAll() {
        //Fetch the stuff here
        //In the while class to add each row to the array
        RowClass row = (RowClass) new Row();
    }
}

But whenever I try to log row.getClass().getName(), it always comes back as Row, not as RowClass, and it acts like Row, instead of the RowClass. How can I make it cast row to RowClass?

Edit: What extends from Table

public class SourcesTable<Rowclass extends Row> extends Table<Row>
{
    public String getName()
    { return "sources"; }

    public String[] getAllColumns()
    {
        String[] columns = { "name" };
        return columns;
    }
}

And I instantiate it with

Tables sourcesTable = new SourcesTable<SourcesRow>();
List<SourcesRow> list = sourcesTable.fetchAll();

Where

public class SourcesRow extends Row
{
    public String toString()
    { return this.data.get("name"); }
}

And

public class Row
{
    public String toString()
    { return ""; }
}

Sorry if this is confusing, I'm learning Java coming from PHP, so I might be going around this the wrong way, I'm just not used to strict type casting

share|improve this question
2  
How could you cast Row to RowClass if RowClass extends Row? –  Marcin Gawel Aug 5 '13 at 23:53
    
Can you show us the invoking code? (i.e., the class that extends Table, and its instantiation). We may be able to better clarify your misunderstanding that way –  torquestomp Aug 5 '13 at 23:55
    
Either your question is poorly worded or I don't understand, because it seems to me that your issues are issues of extension and not generics. What exactly do you mean by "casting a generic to its subclass"? Because RowClass in of itself is not generic. Table and List are... Need more code. –  AmadeusDrZaius Aug 6 '13 at 0:01
    
Sorry for the lack of explanation, I've added some more code –  Gareth Parker Aug 6 '13 at 0:08
1  
@Sello That is not possible. RowClass is a generic type parameter, not an actual type. Because of type erasure, information about exactly what type was passed as the generic parameter is not available at runtime. It is not possible to do new RowClass() from within Table, just as it is not possible to get RowClass.class in that context. The class type will have to be provided explicitly elsewhere (see my answer below). –  Jason C Aug 6 '13 at 0:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is your relevant code (the rest of the code you posted is, in fact, unnecessary :) ):

abstract public class Table<RowClass extends Row>{
    public List<RowClass> fetchAll() {
        //Fetch the stuff here
        //In the while class to add each row to the array
        RowClass row = (RowClass) new Row();
    }
}

It appears that what you are asking is how to create a new instance of RowClass. You can't. Java doesn't provide information about the type RowClass. Because of type erasure, information about the type passed as a generic parameter does not exist at runtime. If you want to instantiate an object of the generic parameter's type, you'll have to provide the class another way. For example (exception handling left out for clarity):

abstract public class Table<RowClass extends Row>{
    private final Class<RowClass> rowClass; // holds the Class of each row
    public Table (Class<RowClass> rowClass) {
        this.rowClass = rowClass;
    }
    public List<RowClass> fetchAll() {
        //Fetch the stuff here
        //In the while class to add each row to the array
        RowClass row = rowClass.newInstance();
    }
}

Then pass Whatever.class to the Table constructor (Table is abstract, so in your case, your subclasses would have to pass their row's class to the super constructor), e.g.:

// assume: SpecialRow and MyCustomRow are concrete classes extending Row
// and defined elsewhere.

// scenario 1 - subclass knows row type
public class SpecialTable extends Table<SpecialRow> {
    public SpecialTable () {
        super(SpecialRow.class);
    }
}

// scenario 2 - subclass still lets user specify row type
public class CustomTable <R extends Row> extends Table<R> { 
    public CustomTable (Class<R> rowClass) { 
        super(rowClass);
    }
}

// usage:
SpecialTable special = new SpecialTable();
CustomTable<MyCustomRow> custom = new CustomTable<MyCustomRow>(MyCustomRow.class);

You could also pass the class to fetchAll, e.g.:

public List<RowClass> fetchAll(Class<RowClass> rowClass) {
    //Fetch the stuff here
    //In the while class to add each row to the array
    RowClass row = rowClass.newInstance();
}

Or even pass an object (similar in spirit to how the generic toArray() works), like:

public List<RowClass> fetchAll(RowClass refObject) {
    //Fetch the stuff here
    //In the while class to add each row to the array
    RowClass row = refObject.getClass().newInstance();
}

For more information:

Edit: There is an alternative design approach here, if my guesses about what you are trying to do are correct.

Because Table is abstract, I get the sense that you're trying to create Table subclasses where the subclass has its own specific row type. In that case, the first option above (pass class type to super constructor) would be the most appropriate. However, instead of doing all this, you may wish to consider letting subclasses instantiate their own, known Row classes, and providing an abstract method that allows the base to do that, e.g.:

abstract public class Table { // no generics necessary
    // subclasses must override this
    abstract protected Row newRow ();
    // the base class can use newRow() to let the subclass determine the type
    public List<Row> fetchAll () {
        // in the while loop to add each row to the array:
        Row row = newRow();
    }
}

This approach has the major advantage of letting Table subclasses that know about their specific Row subclasses construct their Row subclasses as they see fit.

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you so much. You're completely right about what I'm trying to do, and your second answer is much more convenient and fits the purpose more. Sorry for the confusion, I'm trying to learn to build Android apps after coming from PHP, so it's a bit confusing –  Gareth Parker Aug 6 '13 at 1:32
1  
You're welcome. I just edited the above answer to add an example of the usage of a Table subclass (SpecialTable and CustomTable example above). Good luck! You'll figure it out. Java is a very clean language and easy to learn. –  Jason C Aug 6 '13 at 1:36

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