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I have a WAMP 2.0 server installed on Win XP . Apache version : 2.2.11 PHP Version : 5.3 MySQL : 5.1.36

I have about 11 tables in the mysql . Each run of my web application (HTML/Jquery/PHP/MySQL) fills about 100 rows in 2 of the tables.(One of the table has 2 Long blob columns where data of size upto 20MB is uploaded, I have changed the Max_allowed_packet size to 32M in my.ini file )

THe application works fine for about 3 weeks until the number of rows in one of the table reaches >1500 .

THen I see the httpd crash message (Apache httpd encountered error and needs to close )and it says illegal memory refernce Please find below some logs

szAppName : httpd.exe     szAppVer : 2.2.11.0     szModName : php5ts.dll     
szModVer : 5.3.0.0     offset : 0000c309     


C:\DOCUME~1\blrcom\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERc677.dir00\httpd.exe.mdmp
C:\DOCUME~1\blrcom\LOCALS~1\Temp\WERc677.dir00\appcompat.txt

If I clear the two tables (1500 > rows ). Still the problem is seen .

I am using PDO PHP to update the tables.

Can anyone guide me as this is becoming a blocker.

Regards, Mithun

share|improve this question
    
did you check the event log of windows and see what's the reason causing the crash? – mauris Nov 27 '09 at 7:45
1  
The "logs" posted above tell us almost nothing. You could read the minidump yourself (social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en/isvwindowserrors/thread/…, windowscoding.com/blogs/blake/archive/2009/05/12/…). If it's truly a bug, report it to the appropriate (probably PHP or MySQL) developers. – outis Nov 27 '09 at 8:04
    
Faulting application httpd.exe, version 2.2.11.0, faulting module php5ts.dll, version 5.3.0.0, fault address 0x0000c309. – rrmo Nov 27 '09 at 8:09
    
That information is hardly useful to find the cause of the problem. Can you check how large the actual mySQL data directories become when the crash occurs? – Pekka 웃 Nov 30 '09 at 23:54
up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

PROBLEM:

I have a suspicion that you are hitting a 2GB file size wall. 2 problems with your setup:

  • First problem: You are running this on windows.
  • Second problem: You are running this on windows. :-)

REASON:

Jokes aside, Mysql stores data in its root folder (for instance C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.0\data). Each sub-folder corresponds to a db in your instance of MySQL. Inside each folder there is a file with extension .frm which corresponds to your tables. See if the table you are storing your uploads in is approaching a 2 GB limit. Considering that you have a column that store uploads UP TO 20 Mb * 1500 rows - that is roughly around 2 GBs (assuming most of your files are smaller than 20 MB) Unfortunately Windows XP has really hard time dealing with files bigger than 2GB - limitations of the file system and OS. It is the same reason people get in trouble with their outlook - because they don't sort or clean their emails.

SOLUTION:

Third problem - You are storing binary data in a db - never a good idea. Store it on disk - and just keep reference to it (name or path) in your db. Or you can keep your current setup for a while if you move to *nix system that supports larger file sizes. But this is still a bad idea to store binary data of that size in your DB directly. It also makes your DB searches slower, and backups MUCH slower (since there is no easy incremental backup in MySQL)

Hope that helps.

EDIT:

I forgot to mention since you are using WAMP, your MySQLfolder would be in your WAMP installation folder. By default I think it should be in c:\wamp\mysql\data - but I don't remember for sure. I usually use XAMMP on Windows.

share|improve this answer

There are lots of possible reasons why this is happening. Are you keeping an array of all the 20 MB objects in memory? As that grows you could be increasing the per process size of apache to the point where you are out of memory.

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