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I have a template class


template <class T> 
class myClass
{
    public:
        /* functions */
    private:
        typename T::Indices myIndices;  
};
 

Now in my main code I want to instantiate the template class depending on a condition. Like :


myFunc( int operation)
{
    switch (operation) {
        case 0:
            // Instantiate myClass with <A> 
            auto_ptr < myClass <A> > ptr = new myClass<A> ();
        case 1:
            // Instantiate myClass with <B> 
            auto_ptr < myClass <B> > ptr = new myClass<B> ();
        case 2:
            // Instantiate myClass with <C> 
        ....
    }
    // Use ptr here..
}

Now the problem with this approach is that the auto_ptr<> will die at the end of switch{}. And I can't declare it at the beginning of the function, because I don't know the type that will be instantiated before-hand.

I know I'm trying to achieve a run-time thing at compile-time (using template), but still wanted to know if there is some better way to do this.

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You appear to have a terminology problem. You instantiate a class template to create a class. You can subsequently create objects of that type. In the exampel given, you want to instantiate myClass twice, with arguments A and B, but create one object. –  MSalters Nov 27 '09 at 11:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Create a base class

class Base {     
  protected:
      virtual ~Base() {}
      //... functions
};

template <class T> class myClass : Base { 
  //...
};

myFunc( int operation){ 
   shared_ptr < Base >  ptr;

   switch (operation) {        
     case 0:            
          // Instantiate myClass with <A>             
          ptr.reset ( new myClass<A> () );        
     case 1:            
          // Instantiate myClass with <B>             
          ptr.reset ( new myClass<B> () ) ;        
      case 2:            
           // Instantiate myClass with <C>         ....    
     }    
     // Use ptr here..
}
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You could introduce a common base to myClass and use that as the parameter to auto_ptr. Just don't forget to declare that common base's destructor virtual.

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Boost.Variant should do the trick.

myFunc( int operation)
{
    boost::variant< myclass<A>, myclass<B> > obj;
    switch (operation) {
        case 0:
            // Instantiate myClass with <A> 
            obj = myClass<A> ();
        case 1:
            // Instantiate myClass with <B> 
            obj = myClass<B> ();
        case 2:
            // Instantiate myClass with <C> 
        ....
    }
    // Use object here..
}

Using the object is a little different because the type is dynamically determined. The apply_visitor technique is definitely the way to go; see the tutorial for how to use it.

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The issue here is the "un-boxing" required to use the classes in the variant I guess. –  jkp Nov 27 '09 at 8:35

You can add a level of indirection to get what you want. You can avoid a base class with virtual methods and doing any other special stuff.

For example:

template <class T> 
class MyClass
{
    public:
        /* functions */
    private:
        typename T::Indices myIndices;  
};

template<typename T>
static void doit()
{
    MyClass<T> t;
    // Use t here.
}

void myfunc(int op)
{
    switch (op) {
        case 0: return doit<A>();
        case 1: return doit<B>();
        // ...
     }
 }
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low tech solution. use a regular pointer with the scope you want.

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