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I have an object, every member variable in this object has a name which I can acquire it by calling get_name() ,what I want to do is concatenate all the names of the member variables in alphabetical order, then do something. for example:

class CXMLWrapper<class T>
{
public:
    CXMLWrapper(const char* p_name) : m_local_name(p_name)
    {
    }
    //skip the get_name(), set_name() and others    
private:
    string m_local_name;
    T m_type_var;
}
class object
{
public:
    object() : m_team("team"), m_base("base")
    {
    }
public:
    CXMLWrapper<string> m_team;
    CXMLWrapper<string> m_base;
...
}

I have to hard-code like this:

object o;
string sign = o.m_base.get_name();
sign += o.m_team.get_name();

I need a function to do this instead of copying and pasting when the object varies. Anyone has an idea?

share|improve this question
    
Do you have various objects with various member variables? –  doctorlove Aug 6 '13 at 8:56
2  
Maybe you can use some collection for this? Maybe vector. Example: class object{/*....*/ vector<CXMLWrapper<string> > some_vars /*....*/} /*....*/ for(auto& it : o.some_vars { sign += it.get_name;}) Or maybe dictionary/map –  Dark_Daiver Aug 6 '13 at 9:00
1  
It's less a function and more reflection. There are ways to provide some degree of reflection in C++, but if you can do without it would be best. –  Matthieu M. Aug 6 '13 at 9:10
    
@doctorlove yes, many. The copy&paste and sorting manually make me disgusting. –  jfly Aug 6 '13 at 9:12
    
@Matthieu M. Yeah, I write java code too. –  jfly Aug 6 '13 at 9:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One way to do this in normal C++, provided all of the members belong to the same class or are derived from some base class will be to use variable number of arguments to a function. An example follows.

#include <stdarg.h>
string concatenateNames(int numMembers, ...)
{
    string output;
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, numMembers);
    for(int i = 0; i < numMembers; i++)
    {
        MemberClass *pMember = va_arg(args, MemberClass*);
        output += pMember->get_name();
    }
    va_end(args);
    return output;
}

class Object
{
    public:
        MemberClass x;
        MemberClass y;
        MemberClass z;
};

int main()
{
    Object o;
    string sign = concatenateNames(3, &o.x, &o.y, &o.z);
}

If the types of all the members are different, you can look into variadic templates of C++11x: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variadic_Templates, but I can't seem to find a way to do otherwise.

share|improve this answer
    
Though it's not a perfect solution, but it can remove lots of duplicate code. I can use a vector<string> to hold the strings in the for loop, and sort them in alphabetical order, then concatenate. Thanks! –  jfly Aug 9 '13 at 8:01

If variables which have name have a same type (or these types belongs one hierarchy) you can use map of these vars. Is not good way, but maybe it helps you

Example

class object
{
public:
    object() //: m_team("team"), m_base("base")
    {
       this->vars["m_team"] = CXMLWrapper<string>("team");
       //.....
    }
public:
    map<string, CXMLWrapper<string> > vars;
    /*CXMLWrapper<string> m_team;
    CXMLWrapper<string> m_base;*/
...
}

object o;
string sign;
for(auto& x : o.vars)//i cannot remember syntax of for of map
    sign += x.get_name;

PS Sorry for my writing mistakes. English in not my native language.

share|improve this answer
1  
Using this code will enforce stringly typed coding. You probably want the member variables as actual member variables too, not just hidden in a map by name for normal usage –  doctorlove Aug 6 '13 at 9:16
    
@Dark_Daiver thanks for suggestion, but I can't change the layout of the object because it's an argument passed to me. –  jfly Aug 6 '13 at 9:29

One method is to have an external library of member names which the CXMLWrapper class updates:-

class BaseXMLWrapper
{
public:
  void ListMembers (const char *parent)
  {
    // find "parent" in m_types
    // if found, output members of vector 
    // else output "type not found"
  }
protected:
  void RegisterInstance (const char *parent, const char *member)
  {
    // find 'parent' in m_types
    // if not found, create a new vector and add it to m_types
    // find 'member' in parent vector
    // if not found, add it
  }
private:
  static std::map <const std::string, std::vector <const std::string> >
    m_types;
};

class CXMLWrapper <class T, const char *parent> : BaseXMLWrapper
{
public:
  CXMLWrapper(const char* p_name) : m_local_name(p_name)
  {
    RegisterInstance (parent, p_name);
  }
  // you could override assignments, copy and move constructors to not call RegisterInstance
  //skip the get_name() set_name()    
private:
  m_local_name;
}

class object
{
public:
  object() : m_team("team"), m_base("base")
  {
  }
public:
  CXMLWrapper<string, "object"> m_team;
  CXMLWrapper<string, "object"> m_base;
  ...
};

This does add overhead to the construction of objects, but as it's only a constructor overhead it might not affect overall system performance much.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, but I just can't modify the layout or the hierarchy of 'CXMLWrapper'. The 'BaseXMLWrapper' is a good idea! –  jfly Aug 9 '13 at 7:54

This looks like a "observe pattern", you just need to keep a single copy in object as a member variable "string name_;", and pass the name_s's reference into CXMLWrapper like this:

class CXMLWrapper<class T>
{
public:
    CXMLWrapper(const string &name)
        : local_name_(name)
        {
        }
    //skip the get_name() set_name()    
    private:
        const string &local_name_;
}

class object
{
public:
    object()
        : team_("team"), 
          base_("base"),
          m_team(team_)
        , m_base(base_)
        {
        }
public:
    string team_;
    string base_;
    CXMLWrapper<string> m_team;
    CXMLWrapper<string> m_base;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your code is very dangerous and not useable in a context where it normall should. You work with references so CXMLWrapper and obejct can't be assigned. –  Jan Herrmann Aug 6 '13 at 9:15
1  
I don't see an observer pattern in there –  doctorlove Aug 6 '13 at 9:15
    
@JanHerrmann I don't see a danger, and I'm not clear what you mean by "can't be assigned" - you talking about rule of three/five/zero? –  doctorlove Aug 6 '13 at 9:20
    
@doctorlove object a; object b; a=b; does not compile. object* a=new object(); object b(*a); delete a; compiles but creates 2 dangling references to old a's string members. –  Jan Herrmann Aug 6 '13 at 10:02

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