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First hello :) - This is gonna be a long ride so bare with me if you please, I promise it will be fun :)

I'm working on an items system for a game that we're making similar to the old classical Resident evil titles. Currently, I'm implementing items combining, where you combine different items with each other to get something new. Complications come from the fact that there exist items that have more than one level of transformation, and more than one mate for each level. Allow me to clarify, let's assume that we have a green, red and blue herbs. You can't combine red+blue, however you can combine G+B you'd get something like a GreenBlueHerb, or G+R to get GreenRedHerb, now if you combine either of these results to a blue herb, you'd get a GreyHerb. As you see from this example, there are 2 levels of transformation for the green herb, for it to reach the first level, there are two possible mates, (red|blue), from that point going to level two, there's only one mate (blue).

So I came up with an interesting tree, covering all possibilities going down nLevels, not just 2, the more the levels the more complex the tree, have a look at this example of 3 levels, the triangle shape you see in the middle represents an item, and the other colored shapes around it represents possible mates for it to reach the next level:

enter image description here

There's a lot of different combinations, I could first combine my item with the blue one, then the red, then the green, or green, then red, then blue, etc. To reach my final level. I came up with this tree representing all the possible combinations:

enter image description here

(Numbers to the right are the #levels, to the left are the #nodes at each level) But as you can see, it's redundant. If you look at the end nodes they should all be one, because they're all leading to the same final result, which is G+R+B. There are actually 7 possible states in total for this situation, here is the right tree:

enter image description here

This makes a lot of sense, notice the huge difference on the number of nodes.

Now my question is, what is the right data structure for this? - I'm pretty sure there's no built-in one for this, so I'm gonna have to make my own custom one, which I actually did, and manage to get it working but with a problem. (One thing worth mentioning is that I'm getting the nodes information from an XML file, by information I mean the itemRequired to reach a node/level and what's gonna be the name of my item at that node, ex: for the green herb to reach the RedGreenHerb state, it 'requires' a RedHerb, when that combination happens, the name "GreenHerb" will change to "RedGreenHerb" and if you're wondering what happens to the RedHerb, it just disappears, I don't need it anymore), here are my data structures:

public struct TransData
{
    public TransData(string transItemName, string itemRequired)
    {
        this.transItemName = transItemName;
        this.itemRequired = itemRequired;
    }
    public string transItemName;
    public string itemRequired;
}

public class TransNode
{
    public List<TransNode> nodes = new List<TransNode>();
    public TransData data;
    public TransNode(TransNode node): this(node.data.transItemName, node.data.itemRequired) { }
    public TransNode(string itemName, string itemRequired)
    {
       data = new TransData(itemName, itemRequired);
    }
}

public class TransLevel
{
    public List<TransNode> nodes = new List<TransNode>();
    public TransNode NextNode { get { return nodes[cnt++ % nodes.Count]; } }
    int cnt;
}

public class TransTree
{    
    public TransTree(string itemName)
    {
        this.itemName = itemName;
    }
    public string itemName;
    public TransNode[] nodes;
    public List <TransLevel> levels = new List<TransLevel>();
    // other stuff...
}

Let me explain: The TransTree is actually the base node, which has the item's name at start (GreenHerb for ex), the tree has a number of levels (the lines in black you see in the pictures), each level has a number of nodes, each node carries with it a new item data and a number of nodes to point to as well (children nodes). Now you might be asking what is the need to put a list of nodes in the TransTree class? - I will answer that after I show you how I'm getting the data from my XML file:

public TransTree GetTransItemData(string itemName)
{
    var doc = new XmlDocument();
    var tree = new TransTree(itemName);
    doc.LoadXml(databasePath.text);

    var itemNode = doc.DocumentElement.ChildNodes[GetIndex(itemName)];
    int nLevels = itemNode.ChildNodes.Count;
    for (int i = 0; i < nLevels; i++) {
       var levelNode = itemNode.ChildNodes[i];
       tree.levels.Add(new TransLevel());
       int nPaths = levelNode.ChildNodes.Count;
       for (int j = 0; j < nPaths; j++) {
            var pathNode = levelNode.ChildNodes[j];
        string newName = pathNode.SelectSingleNode("NewName").InnerText;
        string itemRequired = pathNode.SelectSingleNode("ItemRequired").InnerText;
        tree.levels[i].nodes.Add(new TransNode(newName, itemRequired));
       }
    }
    tree.ConnectNodes(); // pretend these two
    tree.RemoveLevels(); // lines don't exist for now
    return tree;

}

Here's an XML sample to make everything clear: ItemName->Level->Path (which is nothing but a node)->Path data

<IOUTransformableItemsDatabaseManager>
  <GreenHerb>
    <Level_0>
      <Path_0>
        <NewName>RedGreenHerb</NewName>
        <ItemRequired>RedHerb</ItemRequired>
      </Path_0>
      <Path_1>
        <NewName>BlueGreenHerb</NewName>
        <ItemRequired>BlueHerb</ItemRequired>
      </Path_1>
    </Level_0>
    <Level_1>
      <Path_0>
        <NewName>GreyHerb</NewName>
        <ItemRequired>BlueHerb</ItemRequired>
      </Path_0>
    </Level_1>
  </GreenHerb>
</IOUTransformableItemsDatabaseManager>

Now the problem with doing it like that, is that the nodes aren't connected with each other, so what, what does that imply? Well, if an item takes a certain path to a certain level, then we certainly don't need to keep storing the other paths, which it didn't take, so why keeping them in memory? (there's no transforming back, once you take a path, that's it you're obliged to follow that path, and never look back) What I would like to have, is when I take out a node, all the rest of nodes under it will fall as well, which makes sense, but currently the way I'm doing it so far is something like this:

enter image description here

As you can see the nodes are not connected, what's holding them is the levels! which means that, there is no way for me currently to take out a node, in a way that it takes out all its child nodes. (Doing it without the fact that nodes are connected is really tough and a will degrade performance a lot) Which brings us to:

tree.ConnectNodes(); 
tree.RemoveLevels();

I first connect the nodes, and then remove the levels? why, because if I don't, then each node has two references to it, one from its parent node and other from the current level. Now ConnectNode is actually for the long tree I showed, and not for the optimized one that has 7 states:

    // this is an overloaded version I use inside a for loop in ConnectNodes()
    private void ConnectNodes(int level1, int level2)
    {
        int level1_nNodes = levels[level1].nodes.Count;
        int level2_nNodes = levels[level2].nodes.Count;

        // the result of the division gives us the number of nodes in level2,
        // that should connect to each node in level1. 12/4 = 3, means that each
        // node from level1 will connect to 3 nodes from level2;
        int nNdsToAtch = level2_nNodes / level1_nNodes;
        for (int i = 0, j = 0; i < level2_nNodes; j++)
        {
            var level1_nextNode = levels[level1].nodes[j];
            for (int cnt = 0; cnt < nNdsToAtch; cnt++, i++)
            {
                var level2_nextNode = levels[level2].nodes[i];
                level1_nextNode.nodes.Add(new TransNode(level2_nextNode));
            }
        }
   }

This is ultimately what I want to have on my other tree, but I don't know how to. I want to connect the nodes and form the 2nd tree I showed, which is relatively simpler than 4 levels for ex, I couldn't even connect the nodes in paint! (when I tried 4 levels)

If you stare at it, you'll find some resemblance to binary numbers, here's my tree in a binary form:

001
010
100
011
101
110
111

Each '1' represents an actual item, '0' means empty. From my tree, '001'=Blue, '010'=Green, '100'=Red, '011' means Green+Blue, ... '111'=Grey (final level)

So now I got everything explained, first: is my approach correct? If not then what is? If so, then what is the data structure I could use/make to achieve this? and if the data structures I came up with are in their place, how can I store the data from the XML file to my data structure in a way that, connects the nodes together so whenever I take out a node it takes out its children nodes with it?

Thanks a lot in advance for your help and patience :)

EDIT: Interesting to note that, this whole system is for items that occur only once throughout the game (gets picked up once). This is why whenever I take a path, I remove it from memeory, and also whenever I pick up an item, I remove its entry from the database because I won't encounter it again.

EDIT: Please note that I don't only represent my items via just strings, they have a lot of other properties. But in this situation I only care about their names, that's why I'm dealing with strings.

share|improve this question
    
Is your question related to find the best data structure for this, or the best approach to code this problem ? –  Nicolas Voron Aug 6 '13 at 9:40
    
Well, shouldn't the best approach come from the best/suitable data structure for it? –  vexe Aug 6 '13 at 9:56
    
It depends what you mean by data structure. What i'm trying to ask is "is this a pure theorical approach", or "does this code have to be easily maintainable for future developments" (real game project for instance) ? –  Nicolas Voron Aug 6 '13 at 9:59
    
By data structure I mean the structure that's gonna hold everything together (how the nodes will communicate/connect with each other, the classes/structs used, etc) - 'real game project'? how much real is real? I'm already doing this for a 'real' game project. And yes, I would like it to be maintainable of course. –  vexe Aug 6 '13 at 10:06
1  
I wouldn't call this >> ioublog.wordpress.com/category/gallery << a small project :) –  vexe Aug 6 '13 at 10:10

2 Answers 2

What I don't like in this solution :

  • Simple solutions is best solutions
  • Difficult to maintain since your xml is based on a graph.
  • Don't really take advantage of OOP
  • Source of bugs
  • Probable use of Reflection for small problems (I say small because if your do a such game you'll face far more difficults problems ;) ). This implies unnecessary complexity.

What I like in this solution :

  • You have just perfectly understood the problem. Each item have a list of transormations with some other objects. Now the problem is how to represent (and not store) it

What i would have do (juste IMHO, your solution is good, too) : use OOP in a node-only point of view. So your tree will become a state machine (as you were speaking about path ;) ) if you want to attach that to a data structure.

public class InventoryObject
{
    protected Dictionnary<Type, InventoryObject> _combinations = new Dictionnary<Type, InventoryObject>();

    public InventoryObject() {}       

    public InventoryObject Combine(InventoryObject o)
    {
       foreach (var c in _combinations)
          if (typeof(o) == c.Key)
            return c.Value

       throw new Exception("These objects aren't combinable");
    }
}

public class BlueHerb : InventoryObject
{
    public Herb()
    {
       _combinations.Add(RedHerb, new BlueRedHerb());
       _combinations.Add(GreenHerb, new BlueGreenHerb());
    }
}

public class BlueRedHerb: InventoryObject
{
    public BlueRedHerb()
    {
       _combinations.Add(GreenHerb, new GreyHerb());
    }
}

Then just call BlueHerb.Combine(myRedHerb); to get the result. You can also do BlueHerb.Combine(myStone); and easily debug.

I try to keep my example as simple as possible. A lot of modifications can be done in order to light up the code (a class Herb, a class CombinedHerb, use LINQ queries, etc...)

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, what you just came up with is exactly the way I'm gonna handle 'HealthItems' - in general: items that occur more than once in the game, for a number of reasons one of them is there's no need to be a db for them because the numbers are limited (herbs, drugs, syringes, etc). I can pre-define all that via code. And I actually do have a lot of OOP going on, (inheritance, interfaces, etc) I just didn't show it. Also, the part where you mentioned dictionary, I do have a dictionary as well, with something very similar to yours. –  vexe Aug 6 '13 at 11:07
    
But doing this to all 'other' type of items is just a lot of manual work, I can get away with a general solution that covers the "Other" category of items. Check out this thread for more info on my items gamedev.stackexchange.com/questions/59884/… - I have something in mind, I will see if I can answer my self. I will also look into your idea as well. –  vexe Aug 6 '13 at 11:08
    
Plus, the benefit of my db approach is that now the even game designer/artist could set the mates/levels/paths, I've already made a simple C# app for him to interact with and use for generating xml files. –  vexe Aug 6 '13 at 11:12
    
Ok, now it make sense. Do you know that you can generate classes automatically in c# (the same way as your xml)? –  Nicolas Voron Aug 6 '13 at 11:14
    
What I cant figure out is how your objects exist. Are they just strings ? Because THIS could be a pain to deal with in your game in order to maintain it. –  Nicolas Voron Aug 6 '13 at 11:18
up vote 1 down vote accepted

OK, finally after fiddling around and staring at the whole system for a couple of hours, I came up with an idea yesterday, I implemented it, and it worked pretty well :) I just tested it on 3 level of transformations and it worked like magic. (the pic shows only one combo, but I assure you, all the combos work)

enter image description here

Allow me to share my solution. There was a few tweaks I had to make on my previous system, I will say first what the tweaks are, and then why I made each one.

  • I changed the data stored at each node. In my previous approach, I had each node depend on the previous one, now, nodes requirements comes directly from the root.

Here's how the struct looks now:

public struct TransData
{
    public TransData(string itemName, List <string> itemsRequired)
    {
        this.itemName = itemName;
        this.itemsRequired = itemsRequired;
    }
    public string itemName;
    public List <string> itemsRequired;
}

Node constructor:

public TransNode(string itemName, List <string> itemsRequired)
{
    data = new TransData(itemName, itemsRequired);
}

An example of how requirements are handled now:

Necklace L.1_A: Requires BlueGem
Necklace L.1_B: Requires GreenGem
Necklace L.1_C: Requires RedGem
Necklace L.2_A: Requires BlueGem AND GreenGem
Necklace L.2_B: Requires GreenGem AND RedGem
Necklace L.2_C: Requires RedGem AND BlueGem
Necklace L.3_A: Requires RedGem AND BlueGem AND GreenGem

XML is now:

<IOUTransformableItemsDatabaseManager>
    <Necklace>
        <Level_0>
            <Path_0>
                <NewName>RedNecklace</NewName>
                <ItemsRequired>
                    <Item_0>Red</Item_0>
                </ItemsRequired>
            </Path_0>
            <Path_1>
                        .......
            </Level_0>
        <Level_1>
            <Path_0>
                <NewName>RedGreenNecklace</NewName>
                <ItemsRequired>
                    <Item_0>Red</Item_0>
                    <Item_1>Green</Item_1>
                </ItemsRequired>
            </Path_0>
            <Path_1>
                  .....
        </Level_1>
        <Level_2>
            <Path_0>
                <NewName>RedGreenBlueNecklace</NewName>
                <ItemsRequired>
                    <Item_0>Red</Item_0>
                    <Item_1>Green</Item_1>
                    <Item_2>Blue</Item_2>
                </ItemsRequired>
            </Path_0>
        </Level_2>
    </Necklace>
</IOUTransformableItemsDatabaseManager>
  • I added a root node to my tree, and removed the nodes list it had, this makes more sense. That previous nodes list is now equal to root.nodes

Here's how the tree looks now:

public class TransTree
{
    //public string itemName;
    //public List <TransNode> nodes;
    public List <TransLevel> levels = new List<TransLevel>();
    public TransNode root { private set; get; }
    public TransTree(string itemName)
    {
    //  this.itemName = itemName;
        root = new TransNode(itemName, null);
    }
}
  • Now, why did I make the first change? (the requirements) Because this allowed me to have some communication going on between the nodes, which in turn allowed me to finally connect them the way I exactly wanted (the way they're connected in the 7-states tree ^ above in my Q) How? - In my necklace example, what's the connection between L.1_A and L.2_A? The answer is, L.1_A has one of L.2_A's requirements, which is the BlueGem, they both have it in common which leads us to the conclusion:

Whenever two nodes separated by one level in between have something in common, the node in the above level should point to the one above

So all I do is just go over all nodes in one level, and compare each of that level nodes with each node in the next level, if the node in the first level has one requirement that the node in the next level has, There's is a connection:

public void ConnectNodes()
{
   for (int i = 0; i < levels.Count - 1; i++)
       ConnectNodes(i, i + 1);
   ConnectRoot();
}
private void ConnectNodes(int level1, int level2)
{
    int level1_nNodes = levels[level1].nodes.Count;
    int level2_nNodes = levels[level2].nodes.Count;
    for (int i = 0; i < level1_nNodes; i++)
    {
        var node1 = levels[level1].nodes[i];
        for (int j = 0; j < level2_nNodes; j++)
        {
            var node2 = levels[level2].nodes[j];
            foreach (var itemReq in node1.data.itemsRequired)
            {
                if (node2.data.itemsRequired.Contains(itemReq))
                {
                    node1.nodes.Add(node2);
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
     }
}

Notice the very important line:

ConnectRoot();

public void ConnectRoot()
{
    foreach (var node in levels[0].nodes)
       root.nodes.Add(node);
}

It's clear right? - I'm just connecting the root node to the nodes in the first level, and then I connect the nodes of level1 to 2, 2 to 3, etc. Of course, I have to do this before clearing the levels. That didn't change:

// fetching the data from the xml file
    tree.ConnectNodes();
    tree.RemoveLevels();

Why did I make my second change? (added a root node to the tree). Well, you can clearly see the benefits of having a root node, it makes more sense. But the main reason I implemented this root idea, is to nuke out easily the nodes that I won't take. I mentioned in my Q that whenever I take a path/node, the nodes in that same level should be gone, because that's it, I have taken a road, no going back. With the root at hand, now I could easily say:

tree.SetRoot(nodeTakenToTransform);

No need to go over the nodes I didn't take and null them, just change the root of the tree to the node I took, which has the extra benefit of relieving me from the burden of treating my tree as some sorta linked list, (to access a node down the tree, I have to go through the root, and what's between the root and the node I want to access, and finally reach my destination) - After each transform the root goes down one level, all I need to access now is the root's nodes.

One more problem left. This is a method inside my custom made dictionary to handle items, when an item transforms, it 'notifies' the dictionary to take the necessary actions (update its keys, values, etc)

public void Notify_ItemTransformed(TransTree itemTree, TransNode nodeTaken)
{
   var key = new Tuple<string, string>(itemTree.root.data.itemName, nodeTaken.data.itemsRequired[0]);
   itemTree.SetRoot(nodeTaken);
   itemTree.UpdateNodesRequirements(itemTree.root); // take note here
   RemoveKey(key);
   RegisterItem(itemTree);
}

What does itemTree.UpdateNodesRequirements(itemTree.root) do? My first change introduced a problem. For ex: When I reach L.1_A, I already have the BlueGem in possession right? otherwise I wouldn't have reached this level. But the problem is that all the nodes, after this level that required a BlueGem as well, still require it now, even though I have it! They shouldn't ask for it, ie. BlueGreenNecklace should only require now a GreenGem - Which is why now I have to Update those nodes requirements, by going down recursively starting from my new root:

tree.SetRoot(nodeTaken);
tree.UpdateNodesRequirements(tree.root);

Here's the method:

public void UpdateNodesRequirements(TransNode node)
{
    foreach (var n in node.nodes)
    {
        if (n.data.itemsRequired.Contains(root.data.itemsRequired[0]))
            n.data.itemsRequired.Remove(root.data.itemsRequired[0]);
        if (n.nodes != null && n.nodes.Count > 0)
            UpdateNodesRequirements(n);
    }
}

All I'm saying, "dear next level node, if you require something I already have, please remove that requirement" - And that's it :) Hope you liked my article XD - I will put my next video demo in the question's update when it's out.

Performance-wise? Hmm, there's a couple of places I could do some optimizations, but for now, testing it with 3 levels was really good, no degrade at all. I doubt my game designer will come up with something that requires more than 4 levels, but even if he does, my code should be fast enough, and if not, I could use yield return null in proper places to divide the work on different frames (I'm using Unity3D)

What I really like about this solution is that it works for all kinds of transformation trees, even if it wasn't symmetric, for nPaths and nLevels :)

Thanks to anyone who tried to help, and took the time to read this. -- Vexe

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