Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to be able to do something like this:

class Circle {

    const RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE = M_PI * 2;  // Not allowed

    private $radius;

    public function __construct( $radius ) {
        $this->radius = $radius;
    }

    ...

    public function getCircumference() {
        return $this->radius * self::RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE;
    }

}

But I can't create a class constant from an expression like that:

The value must be a constant expression, not (for example) a variable, a property, a result of a mathematical operation, or a function call.


So my question is: What's the best workaround for this limitation of PHP? I'm aware of the following workarounds, but are there any others which are better?

1. Create a property

class Circle {

    private static $RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE;

    private $radius;

    public function __construct( $radius ) {
        $this->radius = $radius;
        $this->RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE = M_PI * 2;
    }

    ...

    public function getCircumference() {
        return $this->radius * $this->RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE;
    }

}

I don't like this, because the value of $RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE can be changed, so it's not really a "constant".

2. Use define()

define( 'RAD_TO_CIRCUM', M_PI * 2 );

class Circle {

    const RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE = RAD_TO_CIRCUM;

    ...

    public function getCircumference() {
        return $this->radius * self::RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE;
    }

}

This is better, since the value is truly constant, but the drawback is that RAD_TO_CIRCUM has been globally defined.

A digression

I don't understand how this can work. (Edit: I've tested it, and it does work.) According to the Handbook of PHP Syntax:

The const modifier creates a compile-time constant and so the compiler will replace all usage of the constant with its value. In contrast, define creates a run-time constant which is not set until run-time. This is the reason why define constants may be assigned with expressional values, whereas const requires constant values which are known at compile-time.

The manual confirms that "constants defined using the const keyword ... are defined at compile-time".

In this bug report from 3 years ago, a member of the PHP team wrote:

For the class constant we need a constant value at compile time and can't evaluate expressions. define() is a regular function, evaluated at run time and can therefore contain any value of any form.

But in my example above, the value of RAD_TO_CIRCUM is not known at compile-time. So what is the compiler putting for the value of RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE?

I'm guessing that the compiler creates some kind of placeholder for the value of RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE, and at run-time, that placeholder gets replaced with the value of RAD_TO_CIRCUM. Might this placeholder be a kind of resource? If so, maybe this technique should be avoided? The manual says: "It is possible to define constants as a resource, but it should be avoided, as it can cause unexpected results."

3. Create a method

class Circle {

    ...

    private static function RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE() {
        return M_PI * 2;
    }

    public function getCircumference() {
        return $this->radius * $this->RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE();
    }

}

This is my favourite workaround that I'm aware of. The value is constant, and it doesn't affect the global space.

Is there another workaround which is even better?

share|improve this question
    
Hmmm forget my answer, it's totally stupid. x) Can't modify a const value, that's the purpose of it... –  Virus721 Aug 6 '13 at 11:44
1  
Btw solution 2) won't work. define() is runtime while const is "compile" time (i.e done before). –  Virus721 Aug 6 '13 at 11:45
    
Why bother about global scope? M_PI is global as well. –  Bart Friederichs Aug 6 '13 at 11:48
    
Also, ask yourself if you really need this as a constant. Returning $this->radius * M_PI * 2 might be more readable. Let PHP worry about any optimizations. –  Bart Friederichs Aug 6 '13 at 11:51
    
@Virus721 I know const is done before define() – see my "digression". Solution #2 shouldn't work, but it does (I've tested it), and I'd like to know why it works. –  TachyonVortex Aug 8 '13 at 12:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I would recommend this approach:

class Circle {

    ...

    private function RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE() {
        static $RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE;

        if ( null === $RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE )
            $RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE = M_PI * 2;

        return $RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE;
    }

    public function getCircumference() {
        return $this->radius * $this->RADIUS_TO_CIRCUMFERENCE();
    }
}

The goal is calculation only once for all class entities, like a real constant.

share|improve this answer

If you agree to use a standard variable instead of const keyword :

class Foo {

    public $CONST_A; // = calculation A // To let people quickly see the value.
    public $CONST_B; // = calculation B 

    public static function initClass() {
        self::$CONST_A = /* calculation A */;
        self::$CONST_B = /* calculation B */;
    }
}

Foo::initClass();

initClass() is done only once, when the class file is required.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer, but unfortunately it doesn't help me. Firstly, the properties $CONST_A and $CONST_B need to be public static for the code to work. Your answer has the same problem as my solution #1 (the values of the properties can be changed, and so it's not a good workaround for creating "constants"). In addition, since the properties are public, anyone can change their values from outside the class, by doing something like Foo::$CONST_A = 10;. –  TachyonVortex Aug 8 '13 at 12:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.