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I have a question about decorators. I understand what are decorators and I know how to use it, I have read all this tutorial How can I make a chain of function decorators in Python?

I understand that :

>>> def my_decorator(fn):
>>>     print 'Do something before'
>>>     print fn()


>>> def foo():
>>>     return 'Hello World!'

>>> foo = my_decorator(foo)

Is the same at that :

>>> def my_decorator(fn):
>>>     print 'Do something before'
>>>     print fn()

>>> @my_decorator
>>> def foo():
>>>     return 'Hello World!'

I know what are closures and why we use closure in a decorator with parameters (to get the decorator parameters in nested function) but that I don't understand is why we use closure and nested functions to get arguments and the function.

How the closure (or something else) can access parameters and the function outside. I am unable to do the same without the @decorator.

Here for example I can access my foo() and the parameters of the function without passing this function in parameter :

def my_decorator(str):
    def wrapper(fn):
        def inner_function(*args):
            print 'Do something before'
            return fn(*args)
        return inner_function
    return wrapper

@my_decorator('test')
def foo(a, b):
    return a + b


print foo(1, 1)

How this is possible ?

share|improve this question
    
Because that's what a decorator does. It's not a simple function call, it's a decorator, and it gets passed the function below it as the first argument (and the returned function replaces it). –  Lattyware Aug 6 '13 at 13:22
    
and it's magic ? –  Freelancer Aug 6 '13 at 13:22
    
It's not magic exactly - it's like asking why the brackets after a function call it - it's a documented part of the language. –  Lattyware Aug 6 '13 at 13:23
    
What do you mean by "I am unable to do the same without the @decorator"? Please give an example. –  Janne Karila Aug 6 '13 at 13:25
5  
You can do foo = my_decorator('test')(foo), as an alternative to the @ syntax. –  Janne Karila Aug 6 '13 at 13:27

2 Answers 2

I new answer to this like a year ago, let me speculate on this. I think that decorator is a function that takes one argument (function), in your this is what you return wrapper. So you:

  1. call my_decorator function that returns a decorator
  2. witch is a function wrapper that takes only one parameter
  3. you don't call it directly, it is called with @
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks your comment helped me to find how the decorator call all the functions –  Freelancer Aug 6 '13 at 13:47
up vote -1 down vote accepted

I found the solution :

In fact the decorator use the closure functionality : So here is the solution to do the same thing without the decorator and with parameters (it's just to understand the operation, and to learn)

def wrapper(str):
    def decorator_factory(fn):
        def inner_function(*args):
            print 'Do something before'
            return fn(*args)
        return inner_function
    return decorator_factory

@my_decorator('test')
def foo(a, b):
    return a + b

# with decorator
print foo(1, 1)

# without decorator
print wrapper('str')(foo)(1, 1)
share|improve this answer
2  
Another way to look at it is: the_actual_decorator = my_decorator('some_string'). You see, the function my_decorator() is somewhat poorly named (for this example) because it is not really a decorator per se, but a wrapper that returns a decorator with a closure. This returned decorator is the one that is applied to foo(). –  Joel Cornett Aug 6 '13 at 14:15
    
So I have to name my_decorator() in wrapper() ? –  Freelancer Aug 6 '13 at 14:22
    
I edited my answer thanks –  Freelancer Aug 6 '13 at 14:23
2  
@Freelancer rather "decorator_factory"... –  glglgl Aug 6 '13 at 14:24
    
I edited the answer thanks –  Freelancer Aug 6 '13 at 14:27

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