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I have bunch of directories following this structure:

\directories\
 |---\directory1\
 |      |---file1.txt
 |      |---file2.txt
 |
 |---\directory2\
 |      |---file1.txt
 |      |---file3.txt
 |
 |---\directory3\
 |      |---file4.txt
 |      |---file2.txt

I want to merge the directories and files so it ends up like this:

\directories\
 |---\directory1\
 |      |---file1.txt
 |      |---file2.txt
 |
 |---\directory2\
 |      |---file1.txt
 |      |---file3.txt
 |
 |---\directory3\
 |      |---file4.txt
 |      |---file2.txt
 |
 |---\mergeddata\
 |      |---file1.txt (from dir1 and dir2)
 |      |---file2.txt (from dir1 and dir4)
 |      |---file3.txt (from dir2)
 |      |---file4.txt (from dir3)

I am awful with bash and been trying quite a few things but... not getting any good results.

Looking forward to some help!

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You didn't say how you want the files merged, or in what order. I will guess "concatenated, with directory1 appearing before diretory2, and directory2 before directory3"?

The following script shows a straightforward way to do this, without relying on fancy substitutions:

cd directories
mkdir mergeddata
for I in directory1 directory2 directory3 ; do   # replace with your actual directory list
    for F in "$I"/* ; do
        B=$(basename "$F")
        cat "$F" >> "mergeddata/$B"
    done
done

Edit: I added some quotes, in case any of your filenames end up with space characters or other inconvenient white space.

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Why do you use cat instead of cp to copy the file content? –  Gearoid Murphy Aug 6 '13 at 14:22
1  
@GearoidMurphy: Because the original question asked to merge files with like names. Notice that I'm also using the >> append operator to append to the target file as opposed to overwriting it. –  Joe Z Aug 6 '13 at 14:36
    
+1 Useful use of cat! You can use for I in */; do to iterated over the subdirectories of "directories" –  glenn jackman Aug 6 '13 at 15:06
    
@glennjackman: Doing for I in */ would work if the target directory were not in the current directory. But in this example, mergeddata is in the same directory as directory1, directory2 and directory3. The for loop would do surprising things once I becomes mergeddata. –  Joe Z Aug 8 '13 at 14:57
    
In that case, since we're tagged bash, shopt -s extglob; for I in !(mergedata)/ –  glenn jackman Aug 8 '13 at 14:59
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