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I have a dataframe that looks "upper-triangular":

            31-May-11  30-Jun-11  31-Jul-11  31-Aug-11  30-Sep-11  31-Oct-11
OpenDate
2011-05-31  68.432797  81.696071  75.083249  66.659008  68.898034  72.622304
2011-06-30        NaN   1.711097   1.501082   1.625213   1.774645   1.661183
2011-07-31        NaN        NaN   0.422364   0.263561   0.203572   0.234376
2011-08-31        NaN        NaN        NaN   1.077009   1.226946   1.520701
2011-09-30        NaN        NaN        NaN        NaN   0.667091   0.495993

and I would like to convert it by shifting the ith row to the left by i-1:

            31-May-11  30-Jun-11  31-Jul-11  31-Aug-11  30-Sep-11  31-Oct-11
OpenDate
2011-05-31  68.432797  81.696071  75.083249  66.659008  68.898034  72.622304
2011-06-30  1.711097   1.501082   1.625213   1.774645   1.661183   NaN
2011-07-31  0.422364   0.263561   0.203572   0.234376   NaN        NaN
2011-08-31  1.077009   1.226946   1.520701   NaN        NaN        NaN
2011-09-30  0.667091   0.495993   NaN        NaN        NaN        NaN   

EDIT:

I can't exclude that there might be NaNs present in the upper part of the matrix, so we migth see something like this:

            31-May-11  30-Jun-11  31-Jul-11  31-Aug-11  30-Sep-11  31-Oct-11
OpenDate
2011-05-31  68.432797  81.696071  75.083249  66.659008  68.898034  72.622304
2011-06-30        NaN        NaN   1.501082   1.625213   1.774645   1.661183
2011-07-31        NaN        NaN   0.422364   0.263561   0.203572   0.234376
2011-08-31        NaN        NaN        NaN   1.077009   1.226946   1.520701
2011-09-30        NaN        NaN        NaN        NaN   0.667091   0.495993

which should be turned into

            31-May-11  30-Jun-11  31-Jul-11  31-Aug-11  30-Sep-11  31-Oct-11
OpenDate
2011-05-31  68.432797  81.696071  75.083249  66.659008  68.898034  72.622304
2011-06-30  NaN        1.501082   1.625213   1.774645   1.661183   NaN
2011-07-31  0.422364   0.263561   0.203572   0.234376   NaN        NaN
2011-08-31  1.077009   1.226946   1.520701   NaN        NaN        NaN
2011-09-30  0.667091   0.495993   NaN        NaN        NaN        NaN   

Any ideas how to achieve this?

Thanks, Anne

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a way that you can do this using numpy

Input:

In [96]: df
Out[96]:
                 1       2       3       4       5       6
0
2011-05-31  68.433  81.696  75.083  66.659  68.898  72.622
2011-06-30     NaN   1.711   1.501   1.625   1.775   1.661
2011-07-31     NaN     NaN   0.422   0.264   0.204   0.234
2011-08-31     NaN     NaN     NaN   1.077   1.227   1.521
2011-09-30     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN   0.667   0.496

Code

roller = lambda (i, x): np.roll(x, -i)
row_terator = enumerate(df.values)
rolled = map(roller, row_terator)
result = DataFrame(np.vstack(rolled), index=df.index, columns=df.columns)

Output:

                 1       2       3       4       5       6
0
2011-05-31  68.433  81.696  75.083  66.659  68.898  72.622
2011-06-30   1.711   1.501   1.625   1.775   1.661     NaN
2011-07-31   0.422   0.264   0.204   0.234     NaN     NaN
2011-08-31   1.077   1.227   1.521     NaN     NaN     NaN
2011-09-30   0.667   0.496     NaN     NaN     NaN     NaN

Let's timeit

In [95]: %%timeit
   ....: roller = lambda (i, x): np.roll(x, -i)
   ....: row_terator = enumerate(df.values)
   ....: rolled = map(roller, row_terator)
   ....: result = DataFrame(np.vstack(rolled), index=df.index, columns=df.columns)
   ....:
10000 loops, best of 3: 101 us per loop

Note that np.roll is the important thing here. It takes an array, an integer number of places to shift and an axis argument so you can shift an ndarray along any of its axes.

share|improve this answer
df.apply(lambda x: x.shift(-x.notnull().argmax()), 1)

The lambda function finds the location of the first non-null value, and it shifts the row accordingly. Two problems with this: it doesn't take advantage of the known structure (upper triangular), thus possibly sacrificing some speed, and, moreover, it might be fooled by extra NaNs in the data.

Update

A more robust solution, using itertools' counter.

from itertools import count
c = count()
df.apply(lambda x: x.shift(-c.next() + 1), 1)

This is, as expected, a little faster.

In [47]: %timeit df.apply(lambda x: x.shift(-c.next() + 1), 1)
1000 loops, best of 3: 766 us per loop

In [49]: %timeit df.apply(lambda x: x.shift(-x.notnull().argmax()), 1)
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.08 ms per loop
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Dan. Unfortunately I cannot make any assumptions about the NaNs. I have edited the question to clarify. –  Anne Aug 6 '13 at 14:37
    
Hi Dan, I implemented your solution but am seeing a weird problem: The x.shift(-c.next()) will be applied twice to the first row, moving the counter to 2, but then works fine on the rest of the rows. This doesn't make much sense to me... Is it because of the datetime in the index? When I change the function to print out the name of the row it is processing I get 2011-05-31T01:00:00.000000000+0100, 2011-05-31 00:00:00, 2011-06-30 00:00:00 etc, so you see that 31/5/2011 is processed twice. The weird thing is that in the result there is only one row again for 31/5/2011. Any ideas? –  Anne Aug 6 '13 at 16:01
    
That why I have x.shift(-c.next() + 1). I believe pandas is calling the lambda function once before it actually uses it to generate the result. When pandas embarks on a large operation, it sometimes explores separate "paths," ways of executing the function, in search of the fastest one that works. I haven't dug into the code to check that that is what happens here, but that's my guess. Since c is a generator, that path-exploring is problematic, because it advances c by 1. I took the (questionable!) approach of adjusting for that and saying, "Good enough; it works." –  Dan Allan Aug 6 '13 at 16:10
    
@DanAllan exactly right; apply DOES call things twice (on purpose) to see if there are modifies in place (in which case slow path is taken); otherwise a faster path can be taken. –  Jeff Aug 6 '13 at 16:16
    
According to the question there's no need to do any shifting. The indices in the output are the same as the input. See my answer below that uses numpy and is about 7x as fast. –  Phillip Cloud Aug 6 '13 at 16:22

You can count the NaN values, drop them, and append the same amount again at the end. So something like:

def shift_df(row):

    n = len(row)

    new_row = row.dropna().tolist()
    new_row += ([np.nan]*(n-len(new_row)))

    return pd.Series(new_row, index=row.index)

df.apply(shift_df, axis=1)

Where df is your DataFrame. This only works if there are no NaN values between your 'normal' data.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Rutger. Unfortunately I cannot make any assumptions about the NaNs. I have edited the question to clarify. –  Anne Aug 6 '13 at 14:37

Setup

In [23]: df = DataFrame(np.arange(40).reshape(10,4))

In [24]: df
Out[24]: 
    0   1   2   3
0   0   1   2   3
1   4   5   6   7
2   8   9  10  11
3  12  13  14  15
4  16  17  18  19
5  20  21  22  23
6  24  25  26  27
7  28  29  30  31
8  32  33  34  35
9  36  37  38  39

Not sure how fast this will be....

In [21]: def f(i,x):
   ....:     return x.shift(-i+1)
   ....: 

In [31]: DataFrame([ f(i,x) for i,x in df.iterrows() ])
Out[31]: 
    0   1   2   3
0 NaN   0   1   2
1   4   5   6   7
2   9  10  11 NaN
3  14  15 NaN NaN
4  19 NaN NaN NaN
5 NaN NaN NaN NaN
6 NaN NaN NaN NaN
7 NaN NaN NaN NaN
8 NaN NaN NaN NaN
9 NaN NaN NaN NaN
share|improve this answer
    
not sure about your i = 0 case, but if you care you can do a conditional, in the shift if needed –  Jeff Aug 6 '13 at 15:17

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